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The Ariix Scam

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What is Ariix? Ariix is a nutritional company that operates under the network marketing model. It was just started by several former executives of another nutritional company name Usana (Fred Cooper, Jeffery Yates, Mark Wilson, and Riley Timmer). These guys were the ex C.O.O, C.F.O, VP of Sales and Finance for Usana so for them to leave and start their own rival company is sort of a big deal, at least for Usana. So, the Ariix scam, is it actually one? Let’s look at this logically.

These guys were bringing in tons of money from Usana from their salary and stock options. Why would they go and throw that all away to start a scam? It doesn’t make any sense. Since there are actual products involved, Ariix isn’t a scam but it is a multi-level marketing company. Yes, they claim to have great products and a unique compensation plan like all other MLM’s but the downsides of network marketing as a business is still there. Recruiting is involved. Having to sell high priced products is involved (some vitamin packs are $100 and up). Having friends and acquaintances potentially think you’re part of some cult or scam is still involved. It’s just the nature of this industry.

Looking at the stats, very few MLM companies survive past the 5th year. What chance does Ariix have to survive? Well, seeing that it’s being run by folks who ran Usana, a company that has been around since 1992, the chances are probably good. Not only that, many distributors from Usana are switching over to Ariix. But wait, isn’t MLM all about the product as so many of them claim? Makes one wonder.

Of course, these things don’t mean that you should join Ariix. Before you jump in, consider if network marketing as a profession is a right fit for you. It’s not for most people and that’s why so many people fail in this industry. When it comes down to it, it’s about sales, marketing, and networking. Unless you truly believe in the products and the management team behind the company, you’re going to have a hard time succeeding or even looking at anyone in the eye while pitching them a dream.

Because this company is still on the ground floor, it’s likely that many of their reps will use the whole “get in early while you still can” tactic. Take your time and do your due diligence no matter what kind of time limit you’re told. Make sure your decision of whether to join or not is your own and is based on logic and not emotion.

The success of Ariix is yet to be seen since it’s still new but if the people running this company are taking out what didn’t work at the previous company and are applying what worked best to this new company, then they’ll probably be around for a while. Since it’s still so new, you probably won’t be finding any Ariix reviews up for a while so we’ll just have to wait and see how this all plays out.

Let me know your thoughts and experience with this company.

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91 Responses so far | Have Your Say!

  1. Mike  |  August 9th, 2011 #

    There are two types of businesses in the world of MLM. There are those companies whose passion is producing high quality products and MLM is just how they market and sell their products. These are solid legitimate companies. You could probably put Avon, Tupperware, Usana, etc into this category.

    Then there are the companies whose primary purpose is making money and the product is secondary to make it legal (Without a product, then it is an illegal pyramid). Of course all companies need to make money, but these companies the product is secondary and only a means to the end. Take one of the exotic juice for example: Watch a presentation and it is primarily focused on the business plan, income, etc, and the product is secondary. I’ve heard it from a high ranking executive at one company who said “You can buy a similar juice from Costco fro $4.00 a bottle (the MLM sells for $40/bottle) which is basically the same as ours, but the product makes our company legal.” If you see a lot of hype around the money, then suspect this type of company. Also ask if you would buy the products at the price they are offered if there was no income opportunity involved?

    I’ve watched the Ariix presentation and the products are covered in about 3-4 minutes, the rest of the 40 minutes was the pay plan and the money you can make. I also have a friend who works at Usana, he said there had been tension in the hallways between Fred Cooper and the founders. Mr. Cooper was wanting to take the focus off of the products, make them cheaper and drive more to the bottom line and put more into the compensation plan. Making more money is great, but for Usana the core value of the company is the highest quality products without compromise. That was probably the seed that started Ariix.

    So is Ariix a scam? I don’t know, but I suspect from the direction Fred Cooper wanted to take Usana, but wasn’t allowed to, is probably the direction Ariix will go. Lots of focus on the income opportunity and copy cat me too products with probably inferior ingredients, but at a high price. Usana’s multi retails for about $50/month. Ariix’s for $99/month. That extra $49 can pay a lot of commissions and put a lot into the company coffers. But can they get pure customers, with no interest in the comp plan, to pay $99/month for products they can get for say $50 from Usana, Douglas Labs, Life Extension, and a few others? If not, then you have a thinly veiled pyramid which will eventually crumble.

    Like you say, time will tell. There are 4,000 MLMs out there are each year 1000 start up and another 1000 close.

    [Reply]

    Maureen Bell Reply:

    We found the same thing. Very troubling for Ariix. We also learned that Mary Dee and Deanna Latson had joined the company as employees and based on their troubled pasts this was a terrible sign. Their products are anything but clean and now they have key people to match, plus they rip people off with pricing and poor product quality. When I found out about Latson, Mary Dee and the way Fred Cooper and Tim Sales left Usana high and dry, it was game over for me. I wanted a refund but my sponsor told me that they would not give me my money back. Is this true?
    Money, money, money!!!!!! What a scam arrix is…run!!!

    [Reply]

    Carrie Holzemer Reply:

    Can you further explain ‘products anything but clean’?
    Maureen where di you hear about these people leaving usana high and dry? Did you ever hear the other side?

    I just recently joined and absolutely love this company and the integrity of this group of Men. I have met each and everyone of them personally. Stayed with Mark Wilson and met his family and have talked to Deanna Latson several times in length..

    Remember.. Price is what you pay, quality is what you get!

    Maybe you should have some understanding of this industry.

    [Reply]

    loyal Reply:

    you obviously didnt attend any ariix seminar if ur saying all of this .Its ignorant people like yourselves that give MLM a bad name. ~ you throw dirt youll be losing alot of ground HA!~

    [Reply]

    Mike - Gravatar
  2. Kai S.  |  August 12th, 2011 #

    I agree with you Mike. I didn’t realize Ariix sells their multi-vitamins for that much more than Usana. It’ll be interesting to see just how many real customers they can get. My guess very little compared to the amount of distributors.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. - Gravatar
  3. Richard  |  August 15th, 2011 #

    Mike.I have used Usana for 12 years.Only just taken on the business side last couple of years. I always maintained the Products come first and I would still use them for life even if no comp plan was around. They are so good that ALL our family have had major benefits in health restored. Especially my wife who had stage 4 cancers and reversed without chemo or any medications .A major lifestyle change and high doses of Usana saw the cancer reverse in 7 months. Our personal testimony no one can refute. I would never have trusted any other Nutritionals. The proof is in the pudding.
    Like Agel ,Arrix is based on making money and with inferior products ,will go the same way as the others.Especially as Fred Cooper was getting Arrix together while he was in Usana behind their backs.this is total lack of Integrity and Karma has a habit of hitting back .Always has.
    Even Dr Ray Strand gave a “story” explaining why he has left the Advisory board of Usana .By the way his wife was cured of CFS when introduced to Usana products .Even as a Doctor he could not cure her. Yet his story was poorly written and now we find he left to join the Ariix team. Strange bedfellows indeed. Any fool can see its only the money angle and if the products dont stack up ,it will go the way like all the other fly by nighters.Especially when integrity is involved.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    Thanks for the input Richard. I’ve read similar miracle stories from other nutritional companies such as Herbalife as well. Vitamins aren’t meant to cure anything so corporate is careful about not making wild claims but hey, your experience is your experience. You’re a true customer, someone who will buy the products regardless of compensation, and people like you are needed to improve the company’s reputation. Too bad you’re in the minority.

    I take it that many Usana distributors are against Ariix seeing that they’re taking many Usana distributors.

    [Reply]

    Richard - Gravatar
  4. Richard  |  September 3rd, 2011 #

    +Taking Usana customers into Ariix is not a major problem .The way I see it ,they were failing anyway due to not doing the business properly. besides the Products are No1 in the World.So if they still could not “see” this ,how will they progress in another company with inferior products ? If they are only after the quick buck,then they will again fail. MLM success needs HARD work.Self Development is essential.In the end it’s the person you become and the thousands you help along the way. So going for the money will ensure the same results they got previously. Nothing.
    By the way corp. may make no claims about “cures” but using chemo etc is well known to be a shortened journey in life with a terrible quality to boot.
    Our experience with top quality Nutritionals was the opposite . Many more are now experiencing similar results. No miracle there. Well ,not from my perception.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    The high profile reps of Usana that moved over to Ariix were making a lot of money. That’s hardly failing at all. Since these people have huge downlines, having that many people go with them doesn’t exactly give existing Usana reps more confidence in the company.

    [Reply]

    Richard - Gravatar
  5. Jay  |  October 7th, 2011 #

    I joined ariix and after 3 weeks i had my money refund. I paid $1200 in reg fee and $100 a month. Tell me can i get a regular people on that kind of price? I dont think sooo..

    [Reply]

    Violet Reply:

    Hi Jay, I too have recently joined Ariix – for $29.95. I don’t know how you came about paying such a large fee, but I have only paid for my $29.95 Back office System (BOS) plus products that I’m actually using. I have no regular souce of income so initial investment is important to me. Perhaps you simply had the wrong well-intentioned person bring you in and gave you a pitch? I’m actually glad that Tim Sales from Ariix, does NOT use that approach. No get rich quick here!

    V

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    People are encouraged to get the bigger, more expensive package because that’s what the reps push since it gives them more commission. Some will even use the, “If you’re serious about this business, you’ll go for the biggest package” line.

    [Reply]

    Carrie Holzemer Reply:

    Jay.. there are people who do understand investing in themselves. I purchased the $1279 package 3 wks ago and I have signed up 19 people as of today, most invested int themselves… too bad you gave up so early in the game

    [Reply]

    Jay - Gravatar
  6. Kai S.  |  October 7th, 2011 #

    Really depends on who you target and how you present the opportunity. I’m not a fan of MLM but you can argue that a $1,200 investment with $100 a month in operation fees is quite cheap to start and run your own business. Also, isn’t the $1,200 mainly for products and not just reg fees?

    Well, now you know how they really make money in this company… by recruiting people and getting them to buy these packages. Sure beats selling a bottle of $30 vitamins to some old lady.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. - Gravatar
  7. Tina Le  |  December 18th, 2011 #

    This is my experience with Ariix.

    My friend (Tin) invited my other friend and I to join this company approximately a month ago. He had me dressed up professionally and we finally arrived at a house at around 8:00 PM. The first half of the presentation was about the products, their benefits, and their comparison to other companies especially Usana. They proudly stated, “Our products pretty much have the same benefits as Usana, but who wouldn’t love cheaper prices?” The other half of the presentation was about the compensation plan. They quickly talked about pay line, power line, and bonuses. (I became really interested and excited.)

    After the presentation, the Senior Director sat with me to asked me several questions about my goals, what is my major in college right now, etc. basically trying to figure out my “hot spot” (something that is considered a “hot spot” could be a life long goal to help people, family etc. ) He told me how Ariix is about caring and helping people reach their dreams. After that, he pulled out an application, asking me what packages I want to purchase. He asked me for my debit card number and from there he told me it was for a down payment of $40.00 and also the packages for the products which range from:

    $450 – Normal Package
    $720 -Silver
    $1200 – Gold

    At that moment, I was like, “Wait, what?” You said you were helping me reaching my dreams of providing a stable income for my parents, now you’re asking me to get money from my parents? The entire notion became ridiculous to me. The Senior Director suggested that I should tell my parents that I want to take a class on Business and not mentioned about the company at all. (I became suspicious.)

    The next day I went to training and two Senior Directors presented a speech on their life story and how to recruit people. Their life stories were very persuasive and inspiring. However, as I look at it now, it became really fake. One of the Senior Directors spoke about her life experience. She told everyone that she had a difficult time with finances. Here’s the thing, she also informed us that her parents are scientists. Okay, so..scientists make a lot of money. What are you talking about?

    Another senior director also talked about his college experience. He stated that he worked really hard all through high school and college and that he struggled with studying and staying in a relationship. Well, when I checked his Facebook, he looked darn happy in very picture especially there was a photo of his girlfriend wearing only bra and underwear.

    I also went to another training on the same week even though I was determined that this company was a scam. They convinced me once again and I was lured into the company. I lied to my parents and purchased the silver plan. The next morning, I talked to several friends, trying to figure out their hot spots. As I talked to them, I realized how this is not me as all. Considering I’m not the kind of person to convince my friends into joining a company just for my own advantages. They too will be in the same situation as I am and they too will struggle to find people who are not rich and have dreams of providing a stable income for their parents. Moreover, what will they think of me as a person?

    On that same day, Tin informed me that I should recruit people quick to make the Team Lead or else I will have to pay monthly fees for the products. As a college student, I do not have money to waste each month on products I do not have faith in.

    Since my friend is new to the company, Tin offered to help her out and bring me to the company. He loudly stated that I will be under my friend and told my friend that he will only help her this one time. After I purchased the package, he placed me under him instead. It’s ironic because he said that this company was about trust and how everyone got everyone’s back. I questioned, “Then why did you stab my friend in the back?” From my perspective, he was out to help himself. Moreover, the night when I bought the silver package, Tin had to present a speech. He decided to talk about his struggle with basketball in high school. From what I know him in person, he is not what he said he was in the presentation. He smoked weed all through high school, not a motivated kid who wanted to learn basketball. Plus, he told everyone that he has a huge bill to pay off because he broke his leg. However, he bought a Mac worth $2000 and I wondered, “Why can’t he pay his medical bills with that money?”

    My other friend and I decided to quit the company. A few days later, the products arrived and I asked Tin how I could return it. He didn’t seem to want to help me in whatsoever. But he did because I made him. Before that, he had his brother called and yelled at me because I called the company a scam. I didn’t know practicing my freedom of speech would somehow violate his belief that this company is a multi-billion company. At the beginning of the call, he calmly explained that the company believes in 100% customer service and Ariix does not want anyone to spread rumors about the company. When quitting the company, I knew that I wouldn’t tell this to anyone because it would just seem immature of me to talk bad about a company (even if I do not believe in it). However, it was extremely immature of him to yell at me and imply that I was a failure/quitter.

    That is why I decided to write this long message. I believe that most of the people in the company are untrustworthy and only there to help you just because they want you to do good so it will boost their incomes. I also believe that the company is not out to help people at all. They strongly claim to help people but I can strongly see that the company is mainly about money, money, and money.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    Tina,

    Thanks for sharing your experience. To be fair to Ariix, it is a business opportunity and therefore, the cost shouldn’t be much of a surprise. However, what you pointed out is something that happens in all MLM companies and is part of the reason why the industry as a whole has such a bad reputation.

    There are people in MLM who run their business ethically. They don’t exaggerate or make up lies. Of course, there are others who will do things they normally wouldn’t all because of the money and recognition from their MLM peers. The tricky thing is that many people, including your friend I’m sure, didn’t intend to deceive you. To them, they see stretching the truth to get you in as doing you a favor because if you end up successful and rich, the lies will be worth it. I do have to say that the whole putting your friend under him thing was a douchebag move.

    I’m not fond of the MLM industry but saying that “most” people in the company are untrustworthy makes it too easy for Ariix reps to argue against. They might say judging an entire group by the actions of a few is like being prejudice or racist or something.

    By the way, forget what your friend said about you being a quitter/failure. That’s what many MLMers say to prevent people from leaving the company. If your goal is to financially support yourself and your family and you find another way to do that, then you’ll be a success. You’ll only be a quitter if you stop pursuing that goal. The path you take doesn’t matter; what matters is that you ultimately reach your destination.

    [Reply]

    Tina Le - Gravatar
  8. Tina Le  |  December 18th, 2011 #

    I agree with everything you said in your reply.
    Thanks for the advice.
    You’re very wise and kind with your words.

    [Reply]

    Violet Reply:

    Hi Tina, First I want to say that I too have joined Ariix, and my experience couldn’t have been further from yours! In reading your story, it becomes very apparent that everything Ariix teaches (via MLM guru Tim Sales – google him) you NOT to do, was done. No wonder you had a bad experience! This is the type of stuff that gives MLM a bad name. Tim Sales developed his training materials (before Ariix even existed) to bring professionalism back into industry. I hope that one day you’ll be open to give Ariix another try. It’s the second MLM i’ve gotten involved in (the first was Melaleuca with whom I will be a customer for life) and I’m impressed with their training, philosophy and business background. ps. You can join Ariix for $29.95 and spend about $100/month on personal use products which have already started changing my health SIGNIFICANTLY.
    Best, V

    [Reply]

    Tina Le - Gravatar
  9. Rod  |  January 6th, 2012 #

    Hi All,

    Tina, sorry to hear about your experience with Ariix… I truly feel the team you worked with did not give the genuine support you needed, and if the individuals you mentioned are not logical and ethical then I truly believe they will not get far in this business and or life. Ariix is a mlm company, just like Avon and Amway… Ariix is not a scam. With Ariix being in pre-launch I understand there are many skeptics on this ground floor opportunity. I feel that many individuals who start up with Ariix do not understand the significance of the different packages. I’m not here to persuade anyone to join Ariix. But Ariix is a financial vehicle and there are different ones out there, not just Ariix. People mentioned Ariix is a copy cat of Usana, but was Usana the first health supplementation company? Something to think about… Ariix is the first company I know that has a bill of rights to protect its distributors… Whether you feel Ariix will fail or succeed here’s a link to answer some of your questions! Ariixchannel.com

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    The thing with MLM is that the company doesn’t have much control over how individuals run their business and because of this, all it takes is a few bad apples to ruin a company or industry’s name.

    As for people who are not ethical not getting far with an MLM business, depends on your definition of ethical. It’s a common practice in MLM to not reveal what you do to potential recruits until you can have them talk to an upline, see a presentation in full, or attend some meeting. Some would call this practice unethical.

    People link Ariix and Usana together because Ariix is basically run by ex-Usana people. As for Ariix’s success, I’m sure they will make a ton of money. As for most people joining Ariix, I don’t know.

    [Reply]

    Rod - Gravatar
  10. Rod  |  January 6th, 2012 #

    Just a little information on the price difference and similar ingredient listings between the two companies…. Ariix Optimals (Vitamins and Minerals) $99.93 vs. Usana HealthPak $132… you be the judge!

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    Okay, and how many of those have you sold to the marketplace?

    Is it safe to assume that Ariix’s Total Health Pack which sells for $285 has way more stuff than Usana’s Healthpak since you’re not using that in your comparison?

    [Reply]

    BalancedMan Reply:

    Actually Rod, you are off in the information you are providing. You are using the Ariix Optimals (Vitamins and Minerals) for $99.93 vs the correct product from USANA that offers the same product…vitamins and minerals…for USANA, that is the Essentials which is priced at $45.45 on an autoship price NOT what you claim as the USANA HealthPak which offers more products placed into an AM packet and PM packet for easy travel. Yes, I am being the judge and looks like USANA has the better product at a much cheaper price with 100% potency guaranteed. The company has the highest integrity! Can Ariix say the same? Based on results…NO,

    [Reply]

    Rod - Gravatar
  11. Rod  |  January 6th, 2012 #

    The magnitude of the ingredients involved in the Ariix optimals $99.95 are comparable to the Usana Health Pak $132 not Essentials $51.

    If you want to compare with the products involved in the Ariix total health pack lets break it down… With each product lasting 28 days…

    Total Health Pack includes
    Vitamins and Minerals (Optimals)
    Omega Q (Omega 3 hybridized with CoQ -10)
    (2) Vinali’s (Grape Seed extract and vitamin C)
    Rejuveniix (An all organic coffee and energy replacement rich of anti-oxidants)

    Total: $285

    Usana equivalence
    Usana HealthPak (Core supplements including the essentials) $132
    BiOmega (Omega 3) $23.94
    CoQuinone 30 (CoQ10) 45.54
    Proflavanol C100 (Grape Seed extract and vitamin C) $46.74 x (2) = $93.48
    Rev3 Energy Surge Refill 28pk (Alternative to crash-and-burn energy drinks) $63.54

    Total $358.5

    All figures are from their respected website…

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    Thanks for clarifying. So Ariix products cost about 25-35% less than Usana. I guess that means Ariix reps should have a much easier time selling vitamins to the marketplace compared to Usana reps.

    [Reply]

    Bev J. Reply:

    The independent Comparative Guide to Nutritional Supplements ranks over 1600 products. USANA’s main products are ranked #1 (5 Gold Star standard and editors choice) whereas Arrix is ranked a 3. So you be the judge, which is better?

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    And what independent, non-biased guide would that be?

    [Reply]

    Rod - Gravatar
  12. Andrew  |  January 31st, 2012 #

    I ended up buying the gold pack and I was wondering if anyone knows how to return it for a refund?

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    My guess is that you can just call the company and they’ll let you know what to do.

    [Reply]

    Andrew - Gravatar
  13. Tom Baker  |  February 18th, 2012 #

    There’s something very spooky about this whole group at Arrix. If you know the real story about Tim Sales then you know that he would do or say anything for a profit. Word is, Usana is close to bringing a massive lawsuit against them. If true, they could own Ariix, Cooper, Sales, Wilson, And Latson in short order.

    Ariix dumped their crappy products on the Asian market and their u.s. results are going nowhere. They are so heavily in debt that if things don’t pick up you will see more and more departures like the big ones of late.

    Should be interesting to watch. If you worked ar Ariix would you trust any of these top people, after what they did to Usana?

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    Where did you hear about the possible lawsuit? How do you know Ariix is in debt? Which “big ones” departed the company recently?

    Just need to make sure these aren’t just rumors to hurt the competition. If these statements are true, then it would be interesting to see how things unfold.

    [Reply]

    Violet Reply:

    Hi Tom, I too am all for getting the facts if they can be substantiated. So far I’ve heard a lot of accusations on the web with no proof to back them up. I’m new to Ariix, but I’m also not naive to scams. Please tell us where we can find 3rd party verification for the claims you are putting forth so we can investigate for ourselves. I’ve spent hours on the internet trying to verify the accusations I’ve read, but to no avail…and until then – innocent until PROVEN guilty.

    cheers, V

    [Reply]

    Carrie Holzemer Reply:

    Did he ever share this proof?

    [Reply]

    Tom Baker - Gravatar
  14. Jim  |  February 19th, 2012 #

    Things aren’t making sense. You buy some product then come on this site to ask how to return it? Pretty bogus! You’re obviously lying. Next,..top people left USANA because they were failing?? Who are you trying to baffle besides yourself ? And,..the person who said they paid a monthly fee with ARIIX?? You are lying too. And the person who talked about how she was treated by ‘someone’ then critisized a ‘company’ for these guys’ behavior?? That’s like saying Ford is a bad company because someone driving their car ran into me.
    I was just researching this ARIIX co. & looks like they must be doing something right for all of you to be making false accusations about them.
    Top officers of a good co. don’t leave unless there are problems within the co. The time, money, and huge amount of work wouldn’t be worth the effort unless you were in your 20′s.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    You should stop researching and just join Ariix if you haven’t already.

    [Reply]

    Jim Reply:

    Why? Are you suggesting people should join any opportunity that comes along w/o researching it?
    Help me find the truth & I may join them.
    I was trying to research Rob’s claims on pricing & apples to apples. That isn’t so easy.
    What is all in USANA’s HlthPak & ARIIX products do not look to be the same. I’ll have to go back but Usana’s hlth pak I thought said was much less then $132. I’ll look again but,..

    [Reply]

    Jim Reply:

    Sorry !! :( It was $132. Shame on me.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    Just sounded like you were defending the company a bit too strongly, calling people liars, so I thought you were already a rep actually. Sorry about that. Carry on with your research.

    [Reply]

    Jim - Gravatar
  15. Jim  |  February 20th, 2012 #

    I did request some info & answers to some questions from a rep. I found on line for ARIIX & they responed that they were busy but could contact me in the next few days. We’ll see. I did see Multi’s & Minerals from U.were $51 & ARIIX were $99 though I believe ARIIX had a few more ingredience Who would be willing to break the ingredience down so we can compare costs accurately?

    [Reply]

    Jim - Gravatar
  16. Dino  |  March 7th, 2012 #

    A friend brought me to an Ariix meeting. While I found it interesting. I could not help but think that is is a cult ,and a Pyramid scheme. After reading the comments about them,it reinforces my feelings about them. It is also obvious to me that people of Ariix have responded on this page. Expected. Low quality product to me is the bid deal breaker. Won’t sell what i don’t entirely believe in. At the meeting, I felt like they were rushing people to join because they are going to be launching big soon ,and that this is the time to get in on a big opportunity.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    Network marketers overuse the “get in early” tactic. I know Ariix is still in their launch phase or just had it but older companies will say the same thing as well only instead of saying the company is about to launch, they say something along the lines of the team/organization in this city is about to explode so get in before that happens. The point of course is to get people to sign up now rather than give them time to go home to research and think about it.

    [Reply]

    Violet Reply:

    I agree Dino. That’s why I tried the products before saying anything to any body. I’ve been in marketing my whole career- I’m not easily swayed. I hope you tried the products and did your own research on the health benefits of their ingredients before going on line to say that the quality is poor? I’m on 9 different prescription medications and thanks to improved health with Ariix products, I’m starting to wean off of them. I feel good, and I’m grateful I kept an open mind…

    V

    [Reply]

    Dino - Gravatar
  17. Dino  |  March 9th, 2012 #

    Thanks. Feeling rushed, to me is not a good sign. if it is a real opportunity, there is no need to hurry up ,and join. Leaves one with suspicion. There may be no problem with the company ,but feeling rushed is an uncomfortable feeling. If the company is groundbreaking opportunity as they make it sound,then time is of no essence. The comparisons I’ve heard to companies like Herbal Life leaves a bad feeling to me. Thanks for replying Kai.

    [Reply]

    Bev J. Reply:

    I agree. I believe in network marketing because I’ve been able to retire from my full time job and work from home. I make more now and work less. However, I know from experience that my income is only strong if people believe in the products and the company. I want people to stay for the long haul – not to just sign up. So I never pressure anyone and I encourage them to do their due diligence. I am not with Arrix. I know people who joined them and was curious about the company–thus my google search.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    That’s great to hear and encouraging people to do their research before joining is the right thing to do. You’re one of the good ones. I know how it feels to be able to not have to work for or answer to anyone and work from home, doing things on my own schedule. It’s definitely a great feeling. Plus, in my business, I don’t have to go around recruiting people and having random people think I’m a scammer and have to constantly defend what I do. I don’t know how you do it but kudos to you.

    [Reply]

    Dino - Gravatar
  18. Ron Lorenzo  |  March 10th, 2012 #

    I won’t claim to have a wealth of knowledge about Ariix or its management, but what I can claim is that it’s a situation I would prefer to never be in again. Like most people who have posted here, I was coerced by a friend into checking out this “great new opportunity” to help me to financial success. Of course, because I am loyal to my friends and trust them, I agreed to check it out. When I got there, the first thing that took me by surprise was that we were not actually meeting in an Ariix owned or operated building. With an alleged “track record” of success the CEO & President are supposed to have, you’d think it would be a piece of cake to at least lease out a semi-permanent space for this upcoming “big deal” of a business Ariix claims to be.

    Secondly, I was startled by how cult-like the whole environment was. Literally everything the Ariix speaker said was met with phrases like “oh yeah!”, “that’s right!” or “that’s the truth!”. I mean, the guy could have said the sky was red and everyone there would have agreed with him, no questions asked. Once the meeting was over, my friend directed me to some guy who was apparently a big shot at the company. He initially was very friendly and interested in getting to know me, but his pleasantries eventually changed to abrasiveness when it came time for me to decide whether or not I wanted to sign up for one of their “packages”. He kept asking me what my goals were and how I planned to reach them. When I told him I wanted to further my education, he then proceeded to downplay my educational goals, and instead insinuated that Ariix was THE way to accomplishing my financial aspirations.

    What made matters worse was the fact that when I told him I needed more time to fully understand what I may be getting myself into, he then basically told me that there was no “logical reason” for me not to join, and that I’d just be wasting my time by waiting before I signed up. He essentially used all the goals I’d told him I had, and made it seem as if I would not accomplish them without Ariix.

    After that ordeal, I decided Ariix just isn’t right for me. Not only are the representatives pushy, abrasive, and recruitment oriented, but I just can’t see myself calling up my circles of friends and trying to persuade them to join a company who sells products I don’t believe in. In my humble opinion, their whole idea of “creating your own team” is just a way for them to get more people to peddle their products, while putting them under the illusion that they have their own business.

    To conclude, I’d like to make clear that I am not trying to encourage or discourage anyone from joining Ariix. There are some people who may really do well with a Network Marketing company like Ariix. All I’m doing is giving my honest account of my experience, and sharing some questions I had to ask myself when faced with the decision to join this company:

    1)If Ariix is such an excellent opportunity, then why are the representatives so adamant about people signing up after just one presentation? In a company that is projecting such phenomenal success, why do its representatives apply so much pressure to sign up?

    2)Do you see yourself as someone whose good at selling products in an economy as bad as the one we’re in?

    3)Can you see yourself working with (and becoming like) people who behave the way I explained in the second paragraph?

    If you answered ‘No’ or ‘Not Sure’ to any of these questions, you may want to re-evaluate whether or not this is right for you.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    Thanks for sharing your experience Ron. I’ve read plenty of comments on other sites and forums about Usana reps using phrases like, “that’s right” and “that’s true” during presentations and seeing that most of the people who are currently in Ariix are ex-Usana members, the continuation of this method isn’t surprising. From what I understand, the point of having their reps say those words like robots is to create a positive atmosphere as well as to stir up some excitement in order to increase the chances of people signing up. Get people pumped up so they buy more on emotion rather than logic.

    The reason some of them are so pushy is because they know letting potential recruits go home and do research on the company or even talk to people who hasn’t seen the presentation is likely to discourage them from joining. When people are desperate to recruit and build their team in order to make money, some will go a bit far and say things like school sucks, jobs suck, so if you don’t join, you’re an idiot (just not stated that bluntly of course).

    The key for this to work is to have the reps truly believe in the opportunity. That way, they’ll feel it’s okay to be pushy and even stretch the truth if necessary because if they can get the person to join and it changes the person’s life for the better, then no harm done. It’s like how some religious people push their beliefs down other people’s throats thinking that it’s okay because they’re just trying to “save” non-believers’ souls.

    I don’t know what goes on during Ariix’s trainings but I’m sure a lot of it is belief building. I’m not saying that any of this is wrong. I mean if a person truly believes in an opportunity, it would only be natural for them to want to share it with everyone they know.

    Of course the question to ask is how they came to have such strong feelings towards those beliefs. Was it through their own experience and research or was it a result of going through some carefully orchestrated process designed to get people to think a specific way about the opportunity?

    [Reply]

    Ron Lorenzo - Gravatar
  19. jams davis  |  March 13th, 2012 #

    Arrix, what a scam and joke, dont fall for it.

    [Reply]

    loyal Reply:

    do your research shut up ignorant people!

    [Reply]

    jams davis - Gravatar
  20. Wendy Northcut  |  March 16th, 2012 #

    I too joined Ariix based on pressure from a friend. I have been to two meetings so far and whoever used the word “spooky” to define this group and “cult-like” seems to be hitting the nail on the head. My friend knew that my recent divorce left a void in my life, so she probably thought she was doing me a favor. Uh-huh.
    At one meeting a guy by the name of “Bobby” continued to follow me around, and whenever I would look back he was checking me out, again in a spooky, stalker kind of way. His wife was there and everything! I think they both worked for Ariix, and all I can tell you is that it gave me the heebie jeebies.
    Why they allow drinking at these things, I will never know, but he must have been putting them back pretty good.
    On top of this, the whole thing felt staged. Just nothing real about it at all. When the whole Usana questions came up, they tried to move on quickly but one guy just would not let it go. From what I have learned they jumped ship from Usana to start Ariix, which can be a tricky way to start a company when it is only about getting paid. I mean, can you really trust them?
    My guess is that this is just about the money and the people that work there will do anything to sell this product…which made me sick to my stomach. I have taken good, clean vitamins all my life, and let me tell you, this is just not quality stuff.
    At the end of the day, I tried to return everything but it was just too big of a hassle. I think that is what they are hoping for.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    Thanks for sharing your experience Wendy. It looks like you experienced a different type of meeting than what most of the other people have experienced. Drinking? That’s a first. As for Usana reps jumping over to Ariix, many of them didn’t really have a choice. Some of the leaders were forced to for various reasons and once they jumped ship, their downline naturally followed them. I’m still unclear of what really went on to cause the VP and other high execs to form the new company. It could be just because of the money or it could be something else and since I don’t know for sure, I’ll just remain neutral on that subject.

    As for returning the product, yes, the hassle keeps people from doing it but it’s similar to those mail-in rebates. People either forget or don’t bother with it. I don’t know what package you got but that’s at least a few hundred dollars which is supporting a group of people you find cult-like.

    [Reply]

    Violet Reply:

    wow, I’m pretty sure that the real Ariix corporate officers would be appalled by your experience. Like religion, a bad experience will make you toss the baby out with the bathwater. I’m sorry for your experience. I’m glad my invite, was completely the opposite of yours. I would have missed out on a chance to change my health for the better.
    v

    [Reply]

    Wendy Northcut - Gravatar
  21. Tom Baker  |  March 16th, 2012 #

    Thanks for sharing Wendy. My wife and I know some of these people from another company and their actions against that company were without conscious. The “Bobby” that you mentioned must be Bobby Bell, the husband of Mary Dee, although they seemed to have kept different names for legal reasons. There is something “off with these two and the stories continue to pile up about strange liasons and long nights.
    From what my wife told me, this experiment is not working and Dee, Deanna Latson and at least two other add-ons are on their way out. Latson is the phoniest person that we ever met, she has NO real medical background, yet she is their product expert? I mean, come on. This is how you take down Usana, with people of this caliber? I think not.
    We heard again just this week that Ariix is doing business in countries where they have no legal right to do so, and if you want to really screw up a new company, this is exactly how you do it. It’s one thing to ship products for NFR (not for resale), but it’s another thing to aggressively ship products into countries when you have not been approved or taken the necessary legal steps. This has Mark Wilson’s name all over it!
    It is industry knowledge that they bought more than $500,000 in chemically filled product that Usana would never touch and then dumped it on the Asian market. Guess they thought the Asian community would not notice. BIG MISTAKE!
    With the money (other people’s) that Ariix has spent to date, they better make this work, and fast. Usana has deep pockets and you have to know they are taking note of every step that they take. IF this rumored lawsuit actually takes place then I would not want to be in Ariix shoes. This could be one fun story to watch for a very long time! You know what they say, what goes around comes around. Would that ever be true with this cast of characters.

    [Reply]

    Tom Baker - Gravatar
  22. Ras  |  March 21st, 2012 #

    Ariix is not listed in the better business bureau!

    [Reply]

    Violet Reply:

    I’m not sure you’ve done the research about how the BBB works, but Ariix is too new to have a rating from the BBB. Just so you know. The BBB explains how it operates on their website.
    v

    [Reply]

    Ras - Gravatar
  23. missy  |  March 25th, 2012 #

    I would like to know, how can I get a refund from Ariix? I was also kind of pushed so hard by a friend to join and I should of search before. Big mistake.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    There should be a customer service number on your receipt. This is a toll free number I got from their website:

    (855)462-7449

    Hours: M-F 9A to 6P MT

    [Reply]

    missy - Gravatar
  24. doug  |  April 10th, 2012 #

    It has been very interesting to watch the progress or decline of this company. There are so many stories of questionable behavior on the part of the team at ARIIX you have to seriously wonder whether or not they know what they’re doing. From an entrepreneur’s perspective, there are red flags everywhere including the fact that they have been having numerous problems paying commissions out in a timely manner. In fact, their CFO Jeff Yates was on one of their videos apologizing for the problems.

    Their Founder Fred Cooper is in desperate need of cash! He has his Lamborghini for sale in Salt Lake, his wife’s car wash was foreclosed on, and they have been hitting everyone in SLC up for money to invest in this scheme. The bottom line is that they have a myriad of problems and if you’re looking for a secure place to invest your time and money, I would seriously look elsewhere!

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    Can you backup your claims about the Lambo for sale and the foreclosed car wash? I just want to make sure these statements aren’t just made up.

    [Reply]

    Violet Reply:

    Yes, Doug, please give us the 411! How can we verify Fred Coopers financial status and the solvency of Ariix? I’ll continue to do my research too, but I’m not trashing someone or somebody based upon a faceless name on the internet.

    vi

    [Reply]

    doug - Gravatar
  25. doug  |  April 12th, 2012 #

    Here is the vehicle at a dealership in Layton Utah. You can contact the dealer at 866-286-9219

    Link to Lambo Info

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    I replaced the info you put with the link I found on the car. How do you know it’s his?

    [Reply]

    doug - Gravatar
  26. doug  |  April 13th, 2012 #

    Call the dealership….and by the way, how many do you think are in Salt Lake City let alone Layton near where he lives…..

    [Reply]

    Carrie Holzemer Reply:

    Yep, Fred Cooper sold his Lamborghini, He now has 2 Maseratis and a beautiful home

    [Reply]

    doug - Gravatar
  27. Kai S.  |  May 7th, 2012 #

    Don’t followers follow their leaders? Besides, leaders rarely actively build. They leave the hard work to their downline, the ones not making much money yet. So you’re basically saying that those 6 leaders leaving had NOTHING to do with the sales and associates decline Usana had in North America and that the decline was due to an overall decline in the market? So it’s just a coincidence that the first year Usana had a decline in associates happened to be during the time some key leaders left for another company?

    I took your advice and looked at one other company I had in mind, Herbalife.

    “North American region had another strong quarter posting almost 26% net sales in local currency net sales growth and 23% growth in volume points each compared to the prior-year period. New distributors increased 17% in the quarter and Average Active Sales Leaders increased 19% in the North American region compared to last year’s first quarter results.”

    [The comment above is a reply to a comment that was deleted by the commenter]

    [Reply]

    doug Reply:

    So how’s your Ariix business doing Kai? looked like the launch in LA was light in attendance….Curious where you are building and how you’re doing.

    [Reply]

    Violet Reply:

    Clearly you are not a fan of Ariix, Doug. How do you know about the attendance in LA? Were you there? And if so, why?

    [Reply]

    Kai S. - Gravatar
  28. Kai S.  |  May 8th, 2012 #

    @Doug: How could you possibly think I’m in Ariix? I’m not part of any MLM company. I’m an internet marketer, not a network marketer.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. - Gravatar
  29. Doug  |  June 6th, 2012 #

    Kai, keep following the Ariix saga and watch as the truth become more prevalent about what these guys are doing. The car wash that they owned processed a foreclosure sale and is now owned by Mister Car Wash. http://www.mistercarwash.com/ all same locations and addresses. So that’s two for two. Then do some research into the company they were looking to acquire, and their associates, in Japan and how the newspaper said the company backed out because they couldn’t trust….you guessed it Fred Cooper! It’s in the article itself last line.

    [Reply]

    Violet Reply:

    I went to the link – I couldn’t find anything about the foreclosure sale or the subsequent buy of by Mister Car Wash. You are obviously privy to a lot of information and it’s apparent that you want to warn people away from Ariix, so please share with us the source of your info for verification…

    [Reply]

    Doug - Gravatar
  30. Doug  |  June 8th, 2012 #

    I received word from a colleague overseas that the article in the newspaper reported that StarRize an MLM comany based in Japan had been working on a deal with Ariix to be bought out. The company ended the conversations because they felt very uncomfortable with the deal and and it states that they felt that Ariix was no longer trustworthy and that they would work to improve their own business without seeking a purchaser. Another failure for the company overseas in a market where they felt they would have some success. The newspaper is in Japanese, but the translation, even rough, does not fare well for Mr. Cooper and his team.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    I’m not having any luck finding info on this but from all of the things you’re saying, it certainly doesn’t look good for Ariix. I wonder if their reps know the problems that are going on.

    [Reply]

    Violet Reply:

    Kai, neither am I! if you do, please post here and I’ll continue to check back. Also, would love the link for the article in Japan about StarRize and Ariix??

    Cheers, V

    [Reply]

    Doug - Gravatar
  31. Mike  |  December 3rd, 2012 #

    Seeing is believing. SHOW ME THE $$$$$$$$!!!! Is there any document that shows average income of of Ariix employees. Any document shows turn over rate or success rate? Any projected numbers? Most major companies have this information public.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    Ariix is pretty new so I’m not sure if you can call them a major company. Plus, they’re not a public company so they don’t have to reveal as much info as a publicly traded company.

    [Reply]

    Mike - Gravatar
  32. Kevin  |  June 3rd, 2013 #

    I just attended one of their info sessions and offered to let me test one of their products, the revitaliix or something like that, the one with extracts from several superfruits like acai berries, noni, and whatnot along with caffeine. Supposedly gives you a strong boost in attnetion without the crash or the jitters. From what I experienced, all I felt was a lot of gas in my stomach and constant burps throughout the presentation. I could smell the tons of fillers the pill I tested and I don’t believe that it’s anywhere as effective as they advertise. Not only that, they show all of their many different products and how “effective they are”. Premium products without the premium price. They advertise weight loss plans that are as effective as the multitude of other weight loss plans out in the market (weightwatchers and etc) except that it can achieve the same results in about a tenth of the time.

    That right there is already incredibly fishy. If such an amazing weight loss plan was out there, how come they dont charge a higher price for it? If it works as well as it is described, all of these other products should have failed immediately and this one would dominate the market. The price is sold at almost one third of the competitively priced plans by Weightwatchers and related companies. The effects are simply too good to be true, for the price in which they’re sold at.

    Not only that, they keep repeated facts saying that these products have been clinically tested upon thousands of people, yet they would not let me do some research on my own after a single presentation. They would push the, you’ll lose a lot of business as many people are going to be joining in the next few days. They don’t even give me the chance to do research on their so called “clinical studies” without first requesting my Social security number as well as my credit card number… ALL WHILE NEVER HAVING ANY STATEMENT SAYING THEY WILL NOT USING MY INFORMATION FOR ANYTHING. They ask for all of these personal details, a deposit of 30 dollars to show “genuine interest” in the company and my signature, making it so that should anything “happen” to my deposit, my credit card number, or Social security number something I can no longer control or complain about.

    I simply asked for one day to do some more research on the company but they relentlessly kept pushing me to pay the deposit so that I could attend the training session the next day. Another key piece of information is that throughout the multiple “interview” processes before the first info session, they refused to reveal the company name until I actually stepped into the doors of their “office” in which they had actually only just rented and quickly “set up”.

    I really have to say, while this company might have some good ideas in here, their marketing strategy is meant to make money off these poor souls trying to sell this business to other poor souls who try to sell this business to other poor souls. I strongly recommend others to research and understand what this business is about. From my experience, I would strongly advise people to stay away from it. The products do not have any reliable, factual evidence of its success other than several shopped photos. The pushiness of these marketers are far too extreme that it shows that there is more than them trying to “help you out”.

    Stay away! Really, don’t buy into their ideals unless you want to push fake products onto others.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    Thanks for sharing your experience, Kevin. The pushiness is to get you to make a commitment. They know if you don’t get you to sign up right on the spot, the chances of you signing up at all drops dramatically. The whole “sign up now or you’ll miss the train” method is just another sales tactic to get you to decide today and not later. While you’re still in their environment, it’s easier for them to convince you.

    Your experience shows that recruiting is high on their priorities list just like with any other MLM.

    [Reply]

    Kevin - Gravatar
  33. Johnny  |  June 11th, 2013 #

    Hello, I was actually researching this company after one of my friends convinced me to join Ariix. I’d like to share my experience and comments about it so that anyone who is unsure about this company may perhaps gain a conclusion from reading my experience.

    It began with my friend calling me and asking if I’d like to get some work. We talked about it and the whole time she just kept calling it a health company and not really telling me much about the company itself. She connected her “director” onto the phone and she began telling me about how it was a great opportunity because Ariix was a growing company that needed workers to keep up.

    The next day, I car pooled with my friend along with 3 other guys, 2 have already been working with Ariix but the other one was new like me. We went to the session in suits and everything, but the first thing I noticed was that everyone was very positive. Not exactly friendly, but overly positive. I found this strange but I’ve only worked in the physical labor field so I thought maybe this was how office jobs were like. Also, one thing I noticed was that everyone was very young. Most were either fresh high school graduates, such as myself, or college freshmen. Keep this in mind.

    The meeting began with the President introducing himself, telling his little life story, and talking about how great the products were, including a video where a man uses one of Ariix’s water filters to filter his own urine and drink it. This President, 27 years old, introduced his friend whom also had the position of President, also 27 years old. They kept telling us how because they started early, they got to work less and earn more at a younger age. Obviously since the rest of us were young as well, this proved to be very exciting. I also want to note that during the speech, the other reps were shouting “Yeah! That’s right!” and other annoying phrases after each sentence the two Presidents spoke. I admit, I was getting excited because I felt like I had an opportunity that most people wouldn’t have. They talked about the potential amount of money you could make, which they said could be up to $600 a week or something like that, as well as bonuses. At this point, I was ready to get started.

    However, after the meeting, we were all put back into the waiting room where the “directors” ask us questions about our interests, life goals, etc. We are asked for our names, address, DOB, and social security number. However, we also must put a $30 deposit which they call an investment to the company. I gave him (the director) my debit card number because I did not have cash on me but he said he would not take the money yet because I must first provide my social security number. Then, he asked me to choose a package to start off with, which were separated into two categories, supplements and weight loss. I chose supplements, which were separated into 3 packages, starter, business, and elite. The cheapest was the starter which was $260 in total, for a variety of vitamins. This also granted you 150 points, which is instant “activation”. I told him I’d have to pay for that in cash which he said was fine, as long as I did it asap. He then asked me to swear and pinky promise to not mention the company at all, and just call it a health company if anyone asked. Obviously I broke that promise.

    At first, I was completely sold and even returned home without saying anything. However, I’m a person who can’t lie very well, so my mom found out what was going on and told me to be careful and to do my research. I began to believe that I was scammed and because I gave them my card information, I was going to be screwed if I did not act. I quickly called my bank and terminated my card. Now that I am doing research however, that probably wasn’t really necessary, but better safe than sorry I suppose.

    In conclusion, it was a very different experience for me because I’ve never been in the marketing field or any field other than physical labor. After my research, I’ve concluded that if I really wanted to, I could probably make some money from Ariix, but I’d probably have to be a really good salesman, which might resort to some not so good techniques. I’m just a young guy who thought he could have a jump start on a nice career. But I believe I have a good heart, and I just wouldn’t be able to pressure my friends to join this thing or stretch the truth to get people to buy the products. The people who said it had a very cult like atmosphere are completely correct, but I think they were just doing that so they could get a chance to make money. But the problem is that everyone there just wants to make money, the thing they kept repeating was to make money. Money, money, money. I like money, but I can’t work with people who only care about money, and would probably do anything to make that money. If you are good at that sort of stuff, then this probably is a good opportunity for you. Otherwise you’ll just be investing in something you may regret. Thank you for reading and I apologize for my grammar errors and lack of understanding on this type of work. I simply wanted to share my experience as it was and my thoughts about it. I also apologize again because I have left some specific details out because I fear they may come after me since this literally happened a day ago.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    What you experienced is similar to what many people who are exposed to network marketing experienced. Not everyone recruits in this manner but many do. The title of “President” is really just to sound important. What they really are, are recruiters and salespeople. The over the top positivity is to put you in good spirits and get you excited about the opportunity.

    I can’t say if any of this is wrong, perhaps misleading might be a better word. The reason they didn’t want you to say anything to anyone is because they’re afraid someone will talk you out of it without having a full understanding of the opportunity. I don’t know of any other business, besides illegal ones, that does this but I can see why they do it. For many people, the second they hear the words MLM or network marketing or anything to do with recruiting or how you have to invest money, to them, it’s automatically a scam.

    Pinky swear? Really? That’s new.

    A common pattern I’m seeing is the target group they’re after seems to be quite young meaning they’re likely broke and money is important to them and since many of them are in school, they have friends who they can recruit.

    You sound like a good person and I think it was the right choice for you to first do your research. Anytime someone pressures you into putting money down without giving you time to think about it, you’ll probably want to think about it.

    There are many people make money in companies like Ariix but you really have to be okay with doing to other people what they did to you in order to get you in. In your case, you’d have to be OK with stretching the truth a bit and acting overly positive to potential recruits and emphasize how much money someone could make. If you are, then maybe it’s worth a shot.

    [Reply]

    Johnny Reply:

    Thanks for replying.

    I got a call today where the guy told me he wanted to understand why I was so skeptical about it all and when I explained to him, he gave me like a million examples about why this opportunity should not be overlooked and how I should give it a try at least. I am actually interested in trying it out, but I don’t trust the company with my personal information at all, and for that reason I think I rather play it safe and just work to my goals the old fashioned way. Anyway, I told him I was grateful for the opportunity, but would have to think about it some more.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    Like any sales person, any excuses you give him, he’ll have an answer to it. You’re basically having a debate where you’re not really prepared and the other person is. One thing that gets many people to end up joining is the fear that they are passing up on a great opportunity to make lots of money.

    Your “play it safe” excuse can be answered by telling you, “Sure, you can play it safe like the average person and end up living an average life or you can take a chance, a small risk, and end up living your dreams. If things don’t work out, you can always go back to a safe, average life but if things do work out, your life will never be the same again and there’s only one way to find out, so will that be check, credit/debt or cash?

    I suggest making your decision based on logic rather than emotion because they’re trying to appeal to your desires/greed and fears/missing out.

    Regarding your personal information, as with any job where you’re an independent contractor (1099) or a normal employee (w2), you need to provide them with your social security number for tax purposes.

    If you’re still thinking of joining, then just give it a shot. If it doesn’t work out, you’ll learn a valuable lesson in persuasion and the often manipulative art of selling. If it does work out, you’ll prove to be a master at these skills.

    [Reply]

    Johnny Reply:

    I ended up never calling back, haha. What you said was pretty much exactly what he was telling me. He even kept asking me “Just to be clear, the things I am telling you are totally logical and you can’t prove them wrong, am I correct?” after his examples and just generally started sounding very aggressive so I did not want to speak with him anymore. Near the end of the conversation, he asked if I still had any mistrusts, to which I replied “Yes, you.” Then he gave me some sad story about how he got in a car accident and people were judging him because he was asian or something like that.

    Anyway, I believe my decision was logical and I thank you for your replies, as well as having this article here in the first place. I hope many others find it and decide logically as well if they come across this whole Ariix thing.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    I’m surprised he kept going after you said, “Yes, you.” Must’ve been quite desperate to get a new recruit like most network marketers are. Thanks for adding your experience to the conversation.

    [Reply]

    Johnny - Gravatar
  34. David  |  July 14th, 2013 #

    I signed my contract to join Ariix exactly 2 hours ago after being convinced by a really nice rep. I had heard about it through my sister who joined a couple months ago. However after reading the above comments, I realize that this is not for me since I do not have great networking skills and I just can’t see myself forcing others to join and buy these products. I myself am a healthy person so I don’t think I would mind trying these products out, but I do Not think that doing it as a job fits me. Is there anyway I can cancel my joining? Also I gave my credit card # as well as my SSN. Is it safe? I am actually really worried about that. Please reply ASAP. Any help is appreciated

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    Tell whoever signed you up to cancel the application. After they give you 100 reasons why you can succeed and make a ton of money and how you need no networking, sales, or business skills whatsoever, you can try calling the main office. I don’t know what their policy is but there should be a time frame in which you can cancel, maybe 7 days or more.

    Sorry for the late reply. You either figured out how to cancel or you’re now a willing Ariix member.

    [Reply]

    David Reply:

    Haha no problem at all. I already cancelled the day after I posted this. Appreciate the reply man!

    [Reply]

    David - Gravatar
  35. Cameron  |  August 19th, 2013 #

    Well I had a pretty standard Ariix experience in SCV 2 days ago, I was pressured by a friend because I’m strapped for cash and stuck doing day lobor (odd jobs.)
    He called it a “wellness center,” revealing little to no info on the actual job (or lack there of.) He then offered to car pool me over there with another Director.

    It should be noted that the night before I stayed up literally the whole night hoping that it wasn’t a pyramid scheme presentation, because my brother-in-law told me it sounded like Herbalife which he was a part of briefly. Strike 1

    When I arrived to the hotel this sit down was at, the SR Director was about 30-45 minutes late and this was strike 2 for me.

    Before we began, we (myself and one other new recruit) were asked what our dreams and/or college majors were. After that came the long and tedious presentation.

    It began with the products and how they are “better than OTC” because they preserve an apple soaking in a solution of water and the adformentioned supplements and I’ll admit that I was shocked by this.
    Hoever, in retrospect I realize this proves nothing.

    We then moved on to the “man filtering his own urine” video.
    I was pretty astounded by that too.

    After that though we spent an hour and a half discussing payment……..
    Ahhhhh the true pyramid is revealed and you find out that the only reason your friend has brought you to this thing is to try and increase their paycheck by having you become a “Team Leader” as they so boldly put it.
    Oh and don’t forget, “This is a pretty new company so you better get in on it while you have a chance.”

    What those of you who fall for it fail to understand is that YOU are the customer, YOU (and perhaps your pity filled family+friends) are they one’s who will be buying products, and YOU will become the exact person who gave you the speech to begin with.
    If you are fine with this join Ariix today, because you will probably end up quite successful.
    But at the cost of integrity (in my eyes.)

    The end of the presentation is riddled with bonuses and ways to make more money in the company.
    How you ask?
    Oh just by spending a mere $1,350 for the “elite” package, oh and don’t miss out on your double points by spending $150 instead of the initial $30.

    Strike 3, you’re out Ariix!!

    “Will that be cash or card?,” the Sr. Director asks me.

    “I think I need to talk with my girlfriend and other loved ones first.”

    “Oh well just don’t tell them about the products or the business because we don’t want
    them to get the wrong impression.”

    Oh you mean the truth about you being a pyramid scheme?
    -Thinking quietly to myself so I can get a ride home without it being quite the awkward conversation.

    Too bad for you I have enough sense then to just hand over my credit card and SSN info without sleeping on it for at least a day.

    End result, a wasted Friday night.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    Thanks for sharing your experience. You have a pretty good understanding of how the MLM business works. I’ve heard of Herbalife using “wellness centers” but didn’t know Ariix did something similar. Good on you for not being pressured into the business by your “friend”.

    [Reply]

    Cameron - Gravatar
  36. Biff  |  November 27th, 2013 #

    Did you know that the president from Monavie was also from Usana. So why is it such a big deal that Fred has his own company now? Either you like the company and the products or you don’t. Usana does not have the best track record. Wikipedia their previous shady board leaders. Such as Ladd Macnamara was on the board when he lost his medical license as a gynecologist.If the shoe fits wear it. All MLM’s have some skeletons in the closet.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    What they both have in common is they understand the real money is from owning an MLM, not working for one. They were smart to use their inside knowledge of a successful MLM to start their own competing MLM. Kudos to them.

    [Reply]

    Biff - Gravatar
  37. Carrie Holzemer  |  December 29th, 2013 #

    I have read so many comments on this post, some almost 2 yrs old.

    I am a top earner in the industry, and we chose Ariix because of the integrity of the company, products, leadership. You can chose to let someone else shatter your dreams by digging dirt, or you can meet these people talk to them like I did and/or google Mark Wilson and Fred Cooper, they have videos explaining their side.

    I have recently joined Arrix and I am so excited. I have Goosebumps!!!
    I know how to pick a company and I know how to build!! ~ Tim Sales

    My Massage Practice I built to over 600 customers in 9 months, with 80% retention rate…

    Started my career in Direct sales in 2008, prior to this I dabbled in lots of companies..
    2008 My first direct sales company where I built a GREAT team and was on stage in my first year and made Board of directors, doing over 70k in retail sales winning 3 trips, NYC shopping spree, Hawaii and Italy. I loved every moment with this company!!
    Miss you ladies

    2010 I switched gears to health and wellness, with a ground floor opportunity and upgraded our family vehicle to a position where we learned to work smarter not harder and learned a lot about this industry and personal development. In 90 short days my team was unstoppable! In 3.5 yrs this team was built to over 250,000 reps/customers with our biggest MONTH over 5MIL in sales. We were featured in Success from home magazine in April 2011 for being on of the top income earners with this company.
    When I started with this company they where 10 yrs old and still a ground floor opportunity with $29 MIL in sales that year. ending my career 3.5 yrs later with this company sales are $400MIL Think of the lives changed and income generated here!
    This is TEAM effort! Thank all of you for a GREAT journey!

    And NOW we have upgraded that vehicle….. To a Ground floor opportunity, but not a start up company. The owners are not start up people, they are specialist in their field, best at what they do and know what they are doing.. proof $32 MIL in sales in their first year…unheard of! Ridiculous growth! OMG.. think of the lives that will be changed and the income potential here.. I have goosebumps

    I wasn’t wrong before and I KNOW with the leadership in this company with less then 6000 reps in the USA we are positioned right. Remember it is about positioning!

    After much research and meeting these leaders Mike and I are so excited to join this opportunity company, growing people!!

    [Reply]

    Carrie Holzemer - Gravatar

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