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Vector Marketing Scam 2013

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Since you are searching for Vector Marketing scam, I’m assuming that you got a flyer or got something in the mail for this job opportunity where you can make $17 an hour or however much it says on the flyer and you’re wondering if this is too good to be true. Let’s take a closer look at this “job” opportunity which is heavily marketed around summer time when students have a lot more free time.

The Pay

Basically, you are not getting paid by the hour. You really get paid from how many kitchen products you sell. The dollar amount represents per appointment which can be 15 minutes or even several hours. This means that if you do 40 presentations and make less than the amount they are advertising that you would make, then they will give you the difference. The amount will vary from state to state. The commission you can make will normally be greater than the base pay as you do more presentations. Each presentation will be about an hour long so in way it’s sort of a per hour pay but not really. You can do 20 presentations, stop, and never see a dime. Correction: Things have changed. You can make the base pay even if you do just 1 demo for the week and not sell anything. However, the demo must be done in front of “qualified” customers (married, full-time job, over 30, owns a house, have kids). This might vary from office to office.

Note: Different offices have different managers who run their business differently. I’m sure there are many managers who are completely honest and advertise the job as it really is while others might not. All of the horror stories you read online about Vector are most likely from people who happened to come across the bad apples of the company. Keep this in mind as you read the rest of the article.

The Hiring Process

So is Vector Marketing a scam? Well, in theory, no, it’s not. However, their marketing tactics can sometimes be a bit misleading depending on how the managers at certain offices are running their business. Most people go into an interview thinking this is a job where they will get paid by the hour only to find out that it’s really a commission sales job. Unless if you don’t speak English or come in dressed like a bum, you will probably get the second interview (group) and eventually a “job” offer.

You will then usually go through 3 days of unpaid training where you will be taught how to give the sales presentations. During the training, you will be asked to write down the names of everyone you know from friends, family, to neighbors. The reason for this is that these are the people you will be calling to set up appointments to do the presentation to.

After each presentation, you will then ask for referrals and eventually, you will be doing presentations to friends of friends. Since you can always say “so and so referred me to you”, you will still have that trust factor. Why else would anyone let you in when you’re holding a bag of knives? Flyers for Vector Marketing jobs can be found all over college campuses.

The Product

So why does this company sell these Cutco knives, the brand, and kitchen products this way? The reason is because the price of these products makes them extremely hard to sell at the store. When was the last time you even considered buying knives for this much? As you can see here, the prices aren’t cheap.

The quality is top notch though, or is it? Now because of the price tag, they rely on using you as a trust factor to sell to your friends and family. People will buy even if they really don’t want to just to support you.

Can I Make Money with Vector?

Now since you are searching for info on this company, this tells me that you are looking for a job. Can you make money selling knives? Yes, like with other sales jobs, if you’re good, you can make bank. By the way, you will also need to get a sample kit to do your presentations which will usually require a deposit which is refundable. Looks like they recently took this deposit requirement out due to so many complaints over the years. You can now just borrow the sample kit.

Realize that this is a sales position where you will get paid based on how many products you sell. If you are looking for a sure way to make money and you just suck at sales, then you’re probably better off working at McDonald’s. The upside is that you will have a chance to improve your sales skills if that’s what you want and if you’re actually good at it, you can make a lot of money selling these knives, more than most of your friends your age. You will also learn a lot of personal development skills as well. Not all sales companies will take the time to teach you self improvement skills but Vector will for the most part depending on what office you work in. For some, this alone can be life changing.

Just like anything else in life, if you want to be successful, you need to put in the work. People who work hard at this company do make a decent income. But since this is a sales job, only a small percentage of people have what it takes. This is why the turn over rate is so high. Most of the people you go to training with will probably drop out within the first few months.

Feel free to comment below about your own personal experience with Vector.

181 Responses so far | Have Your Say!

  1. C  |  March 13th, 2011 #

    YOUNG STUDENTS BEWARE: Take it from a seasoned hiring and training manager…this is not a good job for you.
    Scenario: I was called by a representative and told I would be paid $15.00/hour as a customer service rep to answer client questions. I have a full time job but wanted a part-time one as supplemental income. This was fine.

    When I arrived I filled out a form and a sign said to sit and wait quietly and wait for a manager. I was taken by the structure and the yound man in a suit that came out to say hello and talk on his cell phone about cutlery. Eventually a young man turned a radio on that skipped and the room started to fill up with other “very young” applicants. Feeling a little out of place being over 40 the others said they were students looking for jobs.

    I was supposed to meet with “Fred” but was called in by another assistant manager that I would guess was maybe 20. I was told this was the first stage and if I had time there would be a second stage for about 90 minutes. I was asked from 1 to 10 (best case) how I would rate my communication skills…I said 10. When asked why I let him know I’m a previous corporate trainer, seminar speaker, and currently an expert in relationship selling in my full time job. I was asked if I looked up information about Vector I told him “Yes” that they sold cutlery and the company had a preference for students to teach them business acumen and protocal. I then asked him the golden question..I was told this paid $15.00 per hour to be a customer service rep. He informed me that they paid $15.00 per appointment and you go to peoples homes to sell cutlery. When I asked why the bait and switch the interview was basically over and I told him with a smirk that I guess I didn’t make the cut.

    Students and young folks….you do not want to start your professional career at this company. The biggest risk I see here is your safety going to people’s homes with knifes???? You can do better!

    [Reply]

    Cody Reply:

    Amen man i cannot agree more! This is a serious scam to college students! I am currently getting a bachelors at ASU and i will tell you one thing, I would rather make minimum wage at McDonalds then this job. I didn’t make the cut because I asked about the bait and switch to! All you business majors falling for this, You should wake up and leave.

    [Reply]

    Christine Reply:

    What do you mean you did not make the cut because you asked about the bait and switch? can elaborate on that comment?

    [Reply]

    Matt Perry Reply:

    My name is Matt and I started at vector as a college student. I have been here for over 2 years and made over 60,000 both years… AS A COLLEGE STUDENT. “A serious scam” could not be a more false statement. Yes it’s true that some people have had negative experiences with the company but obviously being a member of the BBB with an A+ rating would mean that Vector must be doing something pretty well. What they do is develop, train, and increase the skills of young people. My vector experience was life-changing and I would not trade it for anything. The relationships I developed with customers and co-workers were absolutely unbelievable. Yes the job takes hard-work and perseverance, but it’s rewarding if you do. As far as the above statement saying that college kids “can do better than this”… sorry not so. This is the BEST opportunity that could be given to a young person, says the wall-street journal and colleges across the nation.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    There are people making that much part-time running a simple business such as mowing the lawn but it doesn’t mean it’s for everyone. You’re basically stating that Vector is the best opportunity for all college students. I’m glad that you’re doing well with Vector but do understand that the whole, “If I can do it, anyone can” just doesn’t exist. Also, being a member of the BBB although has some credibility, doesn’t really mean much. Amway has an A+ rating as well as people who make tons of money through hard work. By your logic, we should all join Amway.

    Vector isn’t a scam but it’s not for everyone because nothing is, except for oxygen I guess.

    [Reply]

    Bret M. Reply:

    I have an interview with Vector today at 6:30. I’m beginning to become wary of this now. Matt Perry, you sound like someone hired by Vector to post this. Then again, you could be truly stoked about this job!

    Is this job going to involve a moral quandary brought on by selling people overpriced products?

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    I can answer this one. Price is relative. If customers see a ton of value in the products, what many might see as overpriced, these customers will see as a good investment. The key is to truly believe in the value of your product so even if in reality the products are overpriced, you’d at least be able to sleep well at night.

    [Reply]

    Joe E. Reply:

    I was a Cutco salesman 20 years ago (1991). Back then, they made us buy our own sample knife sets and I am glad they did. I’m still using the knives and they are great. I can’t speak enough for the quality of the product. However, as is mentioned above, these knives are a TOUGH sale. I worked at it for about two months and gave up after making only one good sale. With gas prices as they are, I can’t see the average student selling enough to cover expenses.

    [Reply]

    Christine Reply:

    Thank you for saying these very positive words…it is obvious that someone did do all the research correctly about this corporation…If everyone whom are interested in this what i call i so called scam Go to Cutco.com and find out the real truth…This corporation is truly trying to help the younger generation to make it in this cold harded world of business…This is something that most corporations does not even consider to do..anyway.

    [Reply]

    C - Gravatar
  2. Christine  |  June 2nd, 2011 #

    My name is Christine. I answered an ad for Vector back in February for a full time receptionist. I came in, interviewed and got the job. Although I was not sure at first whether or not this was the right postion for me I stuck with it.
    Just a few short months later I am lead receptionist in training to take over and run the receptionist program. The above comment about the receptionist program is horribly misleading. First and foremost-our ads (which are the same for all 800 of our offices throughout the country) do say that a receptionist is responsible for making out-going phone calls to people and schedule them for interviews. We are very clear. Also the representatives know EXACTLY why they are giving us the phone numbers. Also, the list of objections that we give our receptionist are used to answer the questions of people. They are more then one line telling them to speak with a manager. The only time we tell them to talk to a manager is when it is a question about pay-which as a receptionist, we are not qualified to go over the entire pay scale with an applicant.
    I am also a top producing sales representative in the office. On average I only sell about $1500.00 worth of Cutco a week and I make well over $200.00 for 5 hours worth of work.
    I hate to break it to all of the people here bashing the company, but the people who do not do well with the company, the ones who complain that Cutco/Vector are scams are the same people who did not do their job, who did not take the time to schedule appointments and who did not follow the program. The comment that a manager (not trainer) will say is “Success is a choice”. Which is 1000% true. Do you think that Donald Trump became successful because he stumbled into it one day? NO! He chose that path. They are not setting up people up to fail like the above “diet” comment states, they are telling you that they can not make you be successful at Vector, you must choose to be successful. Just like at a diet. A diet will work, if you choose to follow it and be successful…again success is a choice.
    I can guarentee that when a manager tells you to “look up people in the white pages,” they are referring to phone numbers. If you know people and do not have a contact phone number for them, then you can use white pages. We do not encourage people to cold-call, telemarket or go door to door. A matter of fact, when a represntative does not follow that rule, they are asked to return their sample kit and no longer work for Vector…which by the way YOU DO NOT HAVE TO BUY YOUR SAMPLE KIT. The managers are encouraged to choose very carefully who they give the sample kit to, which is why not everyone is accepted for the position.
    Here are some real statics for you all: 60% of people you sit down with WILL purhase Cutco with an adverage order size (in the Mid-West Region) of $240.00. This means that if you sit down with 10 people-bare minimal 6 of those people will buy Cutco spending on average $240.00. This total is a total CPO of 1,440. As a brand new sales represntative (just fresh from traning), this will mean you make$144.00 for 6 appointments. Each appointment takes about an hour-so if you do it our per hour…your making $24.00 for just about an hours worth of work.
    We also have an A+ rating with the BBB and DSA. Also, managers recruit-not hire. You are an independant contractor for Cutco when you become a sales representative. So just like in any other direct sales position-real estate is a huge one-you have to produce your own clientel. Take it from someone who has sold real estate-the direct sales market could be much more difficult then Cutco/Vector. Not to mention, we offer college credits, internships and scholarships based on how you do with the company.
    So let me ask all of you Vector nay-sayers, where else can you work for well above minimal wage, create your own schedule, do training that was created by college professors, have staff that supports you, work as much or as little as you want and can actually advacnce in the company?
    For all of you that are thinking about trying the company out, do not let these people sway your opinion. I came from a job where I worked for minimal wage for a boss that didn’t appriciate me in a company that acted as if they didn’t ever need me. I used to cry everyday on my way into work. Now I am working for a multi-million dollar company, working my way up the ladder to someday run my own office and happier then I have ever been.
    Oh and by the way-my fiance and I will be able to buy a house next year and we are getting married in September based off of my Vector salery-so there is a TON of money in it.
    I highly suggest anyone who is thinking about employment at Vector to not listen to all of the people who did not succeed. Go to Vectors Facebook page and see all of the hundreds and thousands of people who LOVE working for Vector and who do EXTREMELY well. I love my job more then anything. I was a college drop out and this company has given me the encouragment and the strength to go back to school and to learn how to become an even stronger manager and leader.

    [Reply]

    Cody Reply:

    Donald Trump was given 6 million dollars when he graduated Harvard in the 70′s by his dad. If you were to be unsuccessful with that kind of money in the 70′s it would be unheard of. Anyone can be successful with that kind of money back then. Also, there is no steady income so if you are a college student getting a degree then you would know jobs without steady income are idiodic. You make the company 1500 a week and you get well over $200. So maybe $260, basically you just made them $1240 and spread the word out on there knives. You are a source of free marketing. You advertise as you sell. Company wins and you get no where.

    [Reply]

    Just a rep Reply:

    how about this then mr. he was given 6 million, Heffiner was given 10 dollars and everyone now knows about playboy. The thing is even trump wouldn’t have gone anywhere if he didn’t apply himself. just because you have a ton of money doesn’t mean that a. you can be responsible with it or b. invest it properly. It’s not exactly that stupid easy, it just affords you a higher starting point, you still have to be that A-type personality to do anything with it.

    [Reply]

    red Reply:

    Considering you had to go on the offensive and into detail, you shot any credibility you had to defend your work place. I just cancelled an interview after doing research. If thousands of college students were duped, I would say, you were made to defend them.

    [Reply]

    Just a rep Reply:

    note: I’m totally not meaning this to be a knock against you.

    the fact that you cancelled that interview is a good thing, from your response I would assume you are not that A-type personality, and that’s ok, it’s not like you couldn’t reapply in the future if you wanted sales experience, or to try and get that personality that needs to talk to everyone. Just know, it’s not a scam, but it is sales, and you only get out of it what you put into it. Good luck with whatever you choose to do, and i hope you excel at it … so that i can sell you cutco in 5 years :D lol

    [Reply]

    Christine Reply:

    YOu know what ever decision you do make is totally on you..The only thing I am stating is this..If you truly believe you can do well than you will but if you believe that you will not you won’t..And just because someone had a bad experience with any corporation does not mean that you will too…

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    I agree

    [Reply]

    Matt Reply:

    I agree with Christine! I worked for Vector Marketing for a year in a half. The best experience that I could receive as a young guy working while going to college. I graduated with a Psych and Bio background and still succeeded with company due to hard work and perserverence. As a sales rep, I was one of the best in my division making well over 600-800 dollars a week and that was only working 25-30 hours a week. As a Lead Assitant Manager, I taught a lot college students on how to become successfull and lead the office to over a million dollars in sales. I am currently a Account Manager for a sales company as a 24 year old. Without the experience from Vector, I would not be where I am at in my career path. Even though I parted ways with Vector. I am still close with all my customers and make money through them every couple months. For instance, this past Christmas I sent out postcards to my customers. Two weeks later, some customers called me back and I made over 1,000 dollars not doing anything. Vector Marketing is not for everyone. But if your willing to bust your butt of you will make a lot of money, gain valuable experience for your future, and make a lot of connections.

    [Reply]

    Christine - Gravatar
  3. Kai S.  |  June 3rd, 2011 #

    Thanks for your comment Christine. Seeing that there is only 1 comment above yours, who are all of these “nay-sayers” you’re referring to?

    You said: “where else can you work for well above minimal wage, create your own schedule… work as much or as little as you want and can actually advacnce in the company?”

    Vector Marketing is just a sales job. There are many sales positions that allow you to create your own schedule and allow you to make well above minimum wage. You can create your own schedule because if you don’t work, you don’t make money so that’s not really a benefit.

    Also, how come Vector’s advertisement for positions don’t just state that it’s for a sales position? Why not just say it like it is?

    I’m not against Vector as I stated in my post because with most sales job, if you can sell, you can make a lot of money. I’m just pointing out some of the somewhat misleading methods they use to recruit people. This is the main reason why there are a bunch of sites and videos on Youtube from students who hate Vector. If they knew going into the interview that it was going to be a commission-based sales job, I doubt very many people would call Vector a scam.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. - Gravatar
  4. Arlene  |  June 14th, 2011 #

    This is very much like Axis. Christine, you should READ the comment above yours. It says “customer service rep” NOT “receptionist” I hate that they (Vector & Axis) suck you in with their ads and then deceive people. Why don’t they just come out and say what it is? Axis is pretty much the same as Vector which makes me think they are partnered. Kudos Kai! I am looking for a job and this is just wrong that they prey on people like this.

    [Reply]

    Arlene - Gravatar
  5. Kai S.  |  June 14th, 2011 #

    I’m sure they have a crazy high turnover rate and in order to keep making sales, they need to recruit as many people into their sales force as possible, hence, the misleading ads. Saying it’s a commission based sales job will most likely cut down their response rate tremendously. It’s all about the money.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. - Gravatar
  6. Jay  |  June 14th, 2011 #

    A lot of the information in this article isn’t even true. Theres a part that mentions “you can do 40 presentations, stop and not see a dime.” Not true at all. What really happens is at the end of the week you get either your commission pay from sales or about 15 dollars (depending on the area) per appointment. So in that example if you did 40 appointments in a week and didn’t even sell a single product, you’d still get over 600 dollars no matter what. and honestly commission pay will let you see way over that amount most weeks.

    From an actual rep, people I show the products to usually love the company and products. No scam here.

    [Reply]

    adrian Reply:

    hey your seem to be knowledgeable about the company. im reading all of this about the company and am feeling somewhat discouraged. i just got accepted for the position today and decided to study a little bit about vector and i come up on this and read all these things. so in other words, how do i become successfull with sucha job?

    [Reply]

    Jay - Gravatar
  7. Kai S.  |  June 14th, 2011 #

    I guess the rules have changed then. So can a rep make 1 presentation for the week and get paid the base pay if he/she doesn’t sell anything?

    You said a lot of the information is wrong, what else is wrong? I’ll be glad to fix any inaccuracies.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. - Gravatar
  8. lol  |  June 16th, 2011 #

    i think its crazy as hell just becuse u did it or u like what u doing mean some one else is… hell tell me what im going to do when u call me or send me a letter.. any way it went the lie about what u going to be doing and how much u going to make.. so u can get mad cause im telling u this and the next this.. the reason you did it because hell u drop out …not my falt or the other person falt. i got to much to do. instead of going to somebody house that i dont even no that might try to do any thing with me. hell u must dont see how much stuff going on in the USA. hell to may people coming up missing and i hate to tell u this one rite here is not one of them… i rather go working with old people whipping their *** then doing that…

    [Reply]

    lol - Gravatar
  9. Kai S.  |  June 17th, 2011 #

    I’m sorry, what?

    [Reply]

    WellKnown Reply:

    Well. I have successfully read all 127 comments about vector. (15 minutes after applying for the job) I’m not going to lie; I feel a little led astray by the advertisements. Nonetheless, I have the upmost confidence that I can get this job and do decently well. I am far from the best when it comes to marketing (I even talk with a stutter when I get nervous) but fortunately for me, I know a good amount of MAC persons. Now, my question is; when I make appointments, are they set up in the Vector office, or I do I present the advertised product at the customer(s) home?

    [Reply]

    WellKnown Reply:

    I didn’t mean to reply in the middle of ignorance, but if someone could answer my question it would be real helpful :)

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    I’m surprised you went through all of these comments. To answer your question, you’ll be doing presentations at customers’ homes. It’s going to be pretty hard to get people to drive to an office just to hear a sales pitch.

    If you want to be successful with Vector or any sales job, the key is to get in front of as many potential customers as you can and let your increasing experience and the law of averages take care of the rest.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. - Gravatar
  10. Ultimatum  |  June 17th, 2011 #

    “lol” needs to go back to school, because that was so grammatically incorrect it didn’t even make sense. I seriously doubt anyone would hire you for anything besides flipping burgers if you write like that.

    [Reply]

    Ultimatum - Gravatar
  11. Nakoa  |  June 19th, 2011 #

    Ultimatum, well said.

    Christine, you should invest in proper English skills if you’re going to waste so much time writing an essay like so. Your does not equal you’re.
    I got a letter in the mail about this today and I might investigate it myself. I’m not sure as of yet. If I do decide to, I might post my own findings on here.

    [Reply]

    Nakoa - Gravatar
  12. Kai S.  |  June 19th, 2011 #

    Let us know your experience Nakoa. As I pointed out in my post, with sales, people will have different experiences. Some will make thousands of bucks over the summer while others others will leave with resentment.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. - Gravatar
  13. Woody  |  June 19th, 2011 #

    Look, I work as a rep fpr the company and everything seems ligit so far. I signed up online and got the interview the same day. Yes the training is three days long and yes the post is correct about not getting paid to train but after the third day after signing an agreement, and submitting three character references, they give you the sample set so you can make your own friggin cash. I personally have been very successful even though its only my fourth day on the job. This job isn’t for everyone and just like life only the strongest survive. yeah you still make base pay which is 15 per appointment but you have a chance to make your commission instead. Its your choice how you get paid. Its a bad ass secondary job if you want to put effort into it. Just like every sales job thats out there, you bet out of it what you want to put into it

    [Reply]

    Konan Reply:

    I’ve been working for the company for the summer and I haven’t gotten much of anywhere because i don’t know 100+ people for the starting thing. the “MAC” (married, over 30, homeowners) customers. So I floundered and finally gave up. Also a friend of mine had the same job and told me if you don’t know a lot of people, you’re screwed.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    Not entirely true. You just need to know a few people who knows other people since they will be giving you referrals to do demos to. Eventually, you’ll be doing demos to people you don’t know at all.

    [Reply]

    Woody - Gravatar
  14. poops  |  June 20th, 2011 #

    I got a job interview tomorrow i will see how this goes.

    [Reply]

    poops - Gravatar
  15. Curious  |  June 20th, 2011 #

    When I called the company to schedule my interview, the receptionist assured me it was neither a telemarketing nor door to door sales job, and that basically I would be assisting customers when they had questions. But she wasn’t lying when she said it isn’t door-to-door, did she?
    So when the letter says $14.25 base-appt. it means said amount per appointment made? Honestly, my parents worked a job for Kitchen Kraft (only it was pots and pans, not knives) and I understand-for the most part-how that whole pay thing works out.
    Nonetheless, I am completely comfortable with knives; I work with them every day when I cook, and we have had quite a few mishaps. Just as long as this job isn’t like Arbonne, Party Lite, Herbalife, or Pampered Chef I will be fine. Anyway, we shall see how it goes, as my interview is today…I may just turn it down. I want to know what it is all about, but after that, I’m pretty sure I am better off just working where I am right now.

    [Reply]

    Curious - Gravatar
  16. Kai S.  |  June 20th, 2011 #

    It isn’t door to door in the sense that you’re going to strangers’ homes. You will start by doing demos for people you know and then ask for the contact information of their friends and family and go from there. Telemarketing is involved but you’ll be calling a warm market so the chances of being hung up on or cussed out should be extremely low.

    You will eventually be calling and going to people’s homes you don’t personally know but it’s not like cold calling from the phone book or selling cookies door to door. Also, it’s not an MLM; you don’t actively recruit anyone although I’m sure like many companies, if you refer someone to the company, you’ll get some kind of referral bonus.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. - Gravatar
  17. Maggie  |  June 20th, 2011 #

    I actually interviewed for them on Friday and got the job. I’m not really sure if I’m cut out for sales or not, but I’ll definitely try it out for some type of experience. I’m a little confused, though. I thought this company paid you on the number of appointments you’re able to get doing a presentation to these people– family members, friends, etc. They made it clear that it didn’t matter if you actually sold anything at all, so I assumed it was the amount of appointments.
    I hope this job isn’t actually that bad; I do need the money.

    [Reply]

    Maggie - Gravatar
  18. Amber  |  June 20th, 2011 #

    These are all funny comments to read. Anyways, this has helped me out on whether to call to make an appointment tomorrow or not. It has became apparent to me that it wouldn’t be worth bothering calling the company. There are many great sales people out there who can handle this better than I. I am just going to stick to college for now, but thanks everyone for your help on this.

    [Reply]

    Amber - Gravatar
  19. Kai S.  |  June 20th, 2011 #

    @Maggie – I believe the presentations must be done to “qualified” people (married, have kids, etc.); in other words, people who might actually buy something. I don’t think they’ll actually pay you to do demos to a bunch of your college friends.

    @Amber – You can always try internet marketing to make some money on the side. If you’re a freshman in college, by the time you graduate, you’ll likely have enough residual income to be financially independent. This internet business course is one of the best ways to everything you need to know about the business.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. - Gravatar
  20. Jas  |  June 21st, 2011 #

    I actually have an interview with them today and I must say,this article has given me a pretty good idea of what I’m in for. The whole working on commissions doesn’t necessarily appeal to me. From what I understand, if your contacts don’t tell their friends about these knives, then you don’t book appointments, and you don’t get paid. Is that how it works, or can Vector assign people to you?

    [Reply]

    Jas - Gravatar
  21. Brian Dickerson  |  June 21st, 2011 #

    I have been told about 3 times by my friends and family. And after reading that article i have second thoughts of wether i wanna continue working for Vector. Im 17 and just got out of training, this has already drained me. Id rather get paid by the hour instead of commision only. Plus i wanna work somewhere that not everybody knows about, if thats possible. After i get my first ‘paycheck’ i might just quit.

    [Reply]

    Brian Dickerson - Gravatar
  22. B  |  June 21st, 2011 #

    I got a letter from Vector in the mail today. It honestly seemed like a scam just looking at the letter- no return address on the envelope, no address or contact information on the letter (other than the number to call), and not explaining at all what I would be training to do or job titles they were offering while advertising they pay a good sum of money. I asked my dad about it and he had never heard of Vector. So, I typed “vector” into the search engine and “vector marketing scam” was the top result. Reading through this article, as well as the comments, has helped with understanding what Vector is on both sides- for Vector and against Vector. I don’t believe Vector is a scam, but I also don’t believe it is the “right” job for a college student.
    My sisters friend had sold my family a set of Cutco knives through a company like Vector (not sure if it was Vector or not) a few years ago and he said he hated his job. He had said that being a college student and a sales rep was the worst decision he has made. I’m not sure if it was because sales marketing is not for him or because of some other reason, either way, I am not going to call. I would much rather get a job myself than be sent a letter in the mail about a “fantastic job offer” from a company I have never heard of. Obviously if they are sending letters out to everyone, they are desperate for people to come work for them which means desperate to hire anyone.

    [Reply]

    B - Gravatar
  23. Kai S.  |  June 21st, 2011 #

    @Jas – Vector doesn’t typically assign people for you to do demos on. You have to start with people you know and ask for referrals and branch out from there.

    @B – I’ve been wondering how Vector gets the names and addresses of people graduating from high school. I doubt schools just give this info out to anyone who asks. I know with flyers, they just have reps volunteer to go pass them out around college campuses.

    If anyone happens to know how they get students’ names and addresses, let me know. Thanks.

    [Reply]

    Mr.White Reply:

    Vector like so many company’s get there mailing lists from other businesses. An example would be, I get a copy of the latest video game out, and read the manual. The next day a friend of mine wants to know how to play the game, and ,if he can, play with me or my friends on the game. Company’s share your information way more than most people know, and as part of the Internet Marketing Company/Firm you work for, I am a little shocked you even asked that question. *If anyone happens to know how they get students’ names and addresses, let me know.”

    P.S.: You can go on google and find out who is the senior class of the current year, or you can look in different newspapers. Also the small college’s like ITT etc. share information freely as in your name and email. You can get peoples addresses from a persons IP off the email you respond to, otherwise known as Spam.

    Of course, if the people who collect your information are under a privacy policy agreement with you, then they can’t share the info without your knowledge, but that’s why you need to always read the ToS, EULA, and any fine print befre entering information.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    Actually, a receptionist who works for Vector already answered my question down below. According to that person, Vector gets names and mailing addresses of students directly from schools and not some company. A big chunk of people that Vector tries to recruit are graduating high school seniors.

    I understand personal info gets sold all the time but in this case, it’s a little different. Getting names and emails isn’t a big deal but they’re able to target local graduating seniors by physical mail and that’s why I asked the question.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. - Gravatar
  24. Micah  |  June 22nd, 2011 #

    So i went to an interview today, and I was surprised when i got the job, he made it seem like a very “exclusive” thing for me to be hired, I seriously was very happy, but also thought it was too good to be true, and after reading a lot of articles on the internet I have came to the conclusion that the only way you will make money from this company is if you know people, since you don’t go door-to-door selling. I have 20 hours of unpaid training and i do not plan on going, I believe that the company is not a “scam” but is very misleading for young students looking for an opportunity.

    [Reply]

    Micah - Gravatar
  25. Kai S.  |  June 22nd, 2011 #

    @Micah – Technically, you don’t need to know a lot of people. You just need to know someone who knows people who knows people.

    The “exclusivity” is probably used to make people more committed in hopes that they will stick around long enough to make a sale.

    Do they tell you about the unpaid training before or after they hire you?

    [Reply]

    Micah Reply:

    They told me about it during the group interview, and after they hired me.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. - Gravatar
  26. Yoops  |  June 22nd, 2011 #

    I dont think this a scam either, but its a pretty shitty way of getting people interested, i have never herd of this before untill 1 day ago, then i had to google it when i got home. They called me 3 times in a row on my cell phone and the 3rd time they left a message, They said that i was reffered by my friends sister… i would love to know how they got my cell phone number since i know she dosent have it, on the message they left me, all it said was that i was highly qualified for the position and she was interested for me to come in and set up a interview….. she dosent know me yet im qualified, the message also said that they pay $15 PER HOUR, not PER APPT. The job i have right now pays the same, and i love it, i work outside/inside and get to travel and dont have to nag/twist my family and friends arm to buy some overpriced steak knives!

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    From what I know, that’s not the only time they will call you multiple times. Most offices will hold weekly team meetings in which you’re encouraged to attend, non-paid. If you don’t go, they will usually call and bug you. If you haven’t made any appointments or sales for a certain time, they’ll call you as well. Although, this practice isn’t that unusual with these types of sales positions.

    *Just added this reply function by the way*

    [Reply]

    Just a rep Reply:

    so from what you are saying your number is so secret only the CIA know’s it… look all your sisters friend would have to do is ask your sister WHOA MIND BLOWN!. Usually when you get a call like that you are what is called a personal referral, meaning that because a rep is saying “you should give them a job” they already have some insight into your qualifications, it’s more about personality then it is sales experience. for the record appointments are 30-45minuets, some can go over an hour but sell or no sell you get 15 dollars, how many “hours” (appointments) you make and how long they take is on you and the person you are seeing. Further, I take offense to the “over priced steak knives,” I am a rep now and an owner before being a rep, and the last word I would use is over priced, between the quality of the materials used, the finish on the product, and the guarantee of the product. My wal-mart knives nearly stabbed me 3 times because they broke when i was using them. Not only will my cutco knives not break, but i can get them sharpened for free, and if by some miracle of god short of trying to break the knife i manage to break a knife it’s replaced for free. I wonder if you have had non-cutco knives for 15-40 years as some of our customers. hope you enjoy your “non-overpriced” steak knives and their replacement every 5years (assuming you keep them once they are virtually worthless).

    as to the comments about it being a scam, it’s no more a scam then working for your local Mazda/Chevy/Dodge ect. some offer a base salary, but that’s usually only while you train and if you don’t make a sell you don’t get to keep your job. yes you can also work a reg. 9-5 wal-mart/mcdonalds, the difference is if you are a hard worker, you will never get paid what you deserve working there. So really this job is for those that like to work and understand what work is, if you don’t there is always wal-mart and mcdonalds, like vector they are almost always hiring.

    just saying, crying over it “being a scam” when you don’t know about the company is as stupid as me thinking you are a complete moron because of your comments here. So far the only valid claim is those that think it’s a bait and switch with the change of the term “per hour” to “per (hour long) appointment” of course i wonder how many of those people still pay for “finders fee” when they purchase their car … pretty sure the dealership and the sales person didn’t go hunt down that car, that they had to talk you into or maybe that’s their fee for talking you into the car that is almost what you wanted.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    The bait and switch is the only thing I’ve really complained about. Everything else is fine. Since you’ve posted 16 comments, I’ll be keeping my responses short since most of it is aimed towards the commenters who call Vector a scam.

    [Reply]

    Yoops - Gravatar
  27. Tiana  |  June 22nd, 2011 #

    hey I jus got a letter from Vector today….was lookin for a summer job near home. but since my surgery my Mom & I came to an agreement the closer I work home the better. Though transportation would still b a problem, Im pretty sure I can find a way there. I didn’t know what Vector was so of course handy dandy google. Dissappointed to see the scams pop up in my search, but if ur a service rep, it wouldn’t b as bad as goin door to door w/knives right?? I jus wanna work this summer instead of bein in the house all day & goin to doc appts, it gets boring aftr awhile & I’ve been doin this for the past 2 summers & dnt wanna b stuck inside. So can I get some help here??

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    You can’t get closer to home than actually working from home, although, you’d still be stuck inside while you work. However, once you build up enough residual income, you can spend future summers doing whatever you want and still make money. This is what I do and here is where I learned how to do it. It’s not for everyone though. It involves a lot of writing, at least at first, but if you’re okay with that, it can work out quite well for you as it did for me.

    [Reply]

    Tiana - Gravatar
  28. Adrian  |  June 23rd, 2011 #

    I got hired and my training starts next week, but I keep getting disappointed with how I hear almost countless stories of failure with the company and scams; yet it gets contrasted by success stories. I honestly don’t want to have my dreams completely shut down, this is the first job I ever got accepted into, and I’ve been job hunting for the longest time… I wouldn’t mind going to different places, but going to people’s homes would require a good amount of effort, hopefully I’ll ask about running this from my house or somehow going to others homes. Ugh this would completely suck if this “opportunity” was all really just a scam, I guess I can’t talk crap until I try.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    Vector isn’t a scam as I stated in my post. You really can make decent money if you can sell their products. As for success stories, well, you can find success stories in just about any company even the ones that are actual scams.

    [Reply]

    Robert Reply:

    Look it’s not a scam. I started working this week. I am not paid by the company to say this. I know it works because a guy I worked with at a factory job does it full time now. If u wanna make money u just got to work. Working in a factory has taught me that if u want 15 dollars an hour u will be working and hurting yourself alot. Unless ur a trucker u won’t get alot of money sitting on ur ass driving around and that’s the only thing that is hard. The product actually sells itself. U just have to do ur part

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    If the products sell themselves, Vector wouldn’t need you :)

    [Reply]

    Adrian - Gravatar
  29. Agina  |  June 24th, 2011 #

    I work for Vector Marketing as a receptionist. We receive other students numbers from sales representatives that recently starting working with us from their cell phone contacts and Facebooks. What people fail to realize is that YOU posted your number on the internet for ANYONE to see (referring to Facebook). Then you go ahead and blame us and tell us we got your number out of the sky. Also Vector works with schools around the area of which the office is located in, where we receive our mailing addresses from. If you want to be taken off the list, simply call us and a receptionist will take you from the mailing list no problem and no questions asked. As a receptionist as well I am only given so much information to give out to students. If you’re really looking for a job that desperately, you wouldn’t be asking so many questions on the phone and you would figure that you could just give it a shot. I understand the sales rep position is not for everyone, but I have seen many sales reps grow and make more money in a summer then I would see in a year. You also have to remember..it is not what you know, but WHO you know. That statement applies to this position entirely.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    I didn’t realize schools just give out students’ names and mailing addresses like that.

    [Reply]

    Agina - Gravatar
  30. Duncan  |  June 24th, 2011 #

    I just recently started working with vector. I graduated from high school a month ago. I went online to search “Vector Marketing Scam” after one of the calls to the parents of my friends went along the lines of “Is this for the knives? Because you’re being scammed. This is not a real job. I hope you didn’t have to put any money into this. I hope you find something better” *hang up*

    I not only found this to be extremely rude, but inaccurate as well. No, I did not have to put any money into this. I went in for an interview, got informed as to the products, the history of Cutco, and how Cutco markets its products. I was then the only person in the interview room hired (showing that this is NOT a way to bait people into scamming their relatives, otherwise they would have hired everyone). After three days of FREE training, I was GIVEN the kit with which to do the demonstration. I did not have to pay a deposit, I did not have to buy them, they are simply on lease from the company until I decide that I do not want to sell them anymore.

    The pay scale has two parts: I make a base pay of $15 per appointment, and I earn commission from sales. For the first $1,000 of sales, I earn 10%. From $1,000-$3,000 I earn 15%. $3K-$6K I earn 20%, etc. It goes all the way up to 50%. At the end of each week the paycheck will be made out in the amount of which ever is higher: $15 x #of appointments, or commission. Of course, this is a salesman’s job, so experience in sales will obviously bring in more cash for the seller. But for people like me, with at least decent communication skills and ability to convey my thoughts coherently, this is a fantastic opportunity to earn sales experience and gain confidence in speaking to others.

    The reason that Cutco is sold this way is that the company does not want their products to go through middlemen to mark the prices way up like Wusthof, whose sets can range from several hundred dollars to well over $3000. A comparable set of Cutco to the $3000 Wusthof set is literally 1/3 the price. My dad bought a piece of Cutco in about 1996, and it is still in my kitchen today. It has not worn, cracked, rusted, stained, come apart in any fashion; it is still as solid as the first day he got it. It has barely even dulled, which is nothing that a quick run through a sharpener cannot fix. I use Cutco knives every day and they are by far the best knives I have ever used. I believe in this product, even though I have not been working for this company for long.

    Vector is simply a way to spread the word without the company having to spend millions of dollars advertising it. They cannot afford to spend this kind of money advertising due to their unsurpassed warranties. Every knife that is purchased is insured for forever. Literally, forever. If your knife gets dented, chipped, damaged in any way, just send it back and Cutco will send you a new knife for free. Just pay for the shipping of the knife TO the factory. You don’t even have to send in an explanation, the company will give you the benefit of the doubt and replace it. The factory is still getting knives in from about 50 years ago that have simply seen the end of their years, and the company upholds that warranty still.

    The warranty doesn’t only cover replacement, it covers sharpening, too. If you feel that a kitchen sharpener can’t get your blade as sharp as the day it was shipped to you, just send it back to the company and they will sharpen it free of charge. Every piece of Cutco you have.

    I can’t believe that people have slandered this good company’s name for no reason, other than they are afraid to make an appointment with a sales rep, for reasons unknown. I will stand beside Vector in this issue and I will continue to sell knives to anyone willing to buy because I know the quality of the product they are going to receive and I am proud to be the person to sell them such a product.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    Perhaps different offices operate differently but there are definitely offices that require a deposit on the knives, otherwise, people can just take them. You said you were the only one hired, out of how many? Some could’ve just chose not to take the job after finding out what it really is.

    You say the training is free as if that is a bonus or something. Typically, a company will pay for your time to go to training. With 100% commission sales jobs, it’s normally unpaid so having “free” training isn’t anything to be bragging about.

    I don’t buy the whole middleman story. It’s the same story multi-level marketing companies use. The MAIN reason they sell their products this way is because it’s easier to sell high priced products when you use the trust factor. People are more likely to buy from people they trust. Some people will buy simply because they want to support you.

    The forever guarantee is definitely a bonus so no arguing there. Although, no one here has really said anything negative about the knives themselves. Most of the “slander” is based on the fact that people come into the interview thinking it’s an hourly paid job due to the way Vector advertises their job openings. Sales is definitely a great industry to be in if you’re looking to improve your communication and persuasion skills. If Vector would just advertise their positions as a sales job, there wouldn’t be so many Vector haters.

    In any case, I’m glad you’re doing well with Vector.

    [Reply]

    Just a rep Reply:

    there was a time you had to put a deposit on your demo set, since then they are on loan so long as you can get and complete at least 3 demo’s a week, if you can not do that you have to return them and check them out on a per appointment basis. Failure to return the demo set can result in legal prosecution because a fundamental rule in paying someone is you can not remove monies from a check for “theft of property.” They also allow people to purchase their demo sets at 75% reduced cost, assuming the rep wants to go very part time with it but still have the set always at the ready, and honestly everyone loves using the knives as well so it’s a bonus.

    The reason the free training was brought up is because some college campuses use the vector training as a part of a sales class, so while yes you are not paid for the training it is also very different from training at mcdonalds, or wal-mart (which I’ve done both, and all they do is sit you at a computer), so well not brag worthy it is worth mentioning.

    The middleman story is very true, working in retail there is a cost to that has to be recouped and while they might be able to do that and still discount the knives, the problem becomes simply this, space = money, and how many of you would buy a new car without even one test drive, or for that matter a used car without one test drive, the amount of the investment is too high for most to justify. What i don’t believe has been mentioned is that there is a 15-day money back guarantee, and when demonstrations are done over the phone that is extended to 30 days because the customer has not had the chance to experience the knives like an in-home visit. (and the car reference was in there because it’s not the “trust factor” it’s the “holy crap I didn’t know knives could do this” factor.)

    I appreciate your mostly unbiased opinion on the matter I can understand where it is coming from because I am assuming you have not had the opportunity to experience the knives.

    All I can really say to most of the people posting here is this, give the Vector rep a chance to show you the product, you don’t have to buy, and even if you don’t meet the “qualified” list (which is have a job, and over 25 years old) at the very least you are giving someone the opportunity to use a skill they might not have been able to use before, and maybe even help them with their presentations. Really what can an hour hurt?

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    I’ve already pointed out the change in the whole demo kit purchase thing some time ago. Some of these comments are old.

    [Reply]

    DM Reply:

    Duncan,

    It’s really nice to see a well informed rep comment on this page logically and without grammatical errors…lol. Obviously your manager is prepared and has done well informing you on the details of the position. I understand your frustration, as a recruiter for this wonderful business I feel the same, however what you have to realize is that every manager is different, and yes, Kai, every office is run differently. It’s like going to a McDonalds (no offense to anyone) in the hood, and going to a McDonalds in an upscale suburb…same product/store/company, and an entirely different experience. Receptionists are supposed to be trained to explain the position as an entry level sales and customer service position, with a base rate of pay of $xx.xx (depending on the region) and ensure applicants that the pay is based per appointment, not per hour. I would fire my receptionist if I ever heard her say that. I am not in the business of surprising people I believe in full disclosure. I would never want to recruit someone who doesn’t fully understand how our business works. However, as previously stated, every office is different. It depends on the honesty, ethics, and preparation of the manager in question. The people that are saying that its a scam had one of two experiences; they either didn’t follow the program explained in their training, or they had an under-prepared manager or one with questionable ethics. Either way, its unfortunate…I cannot speak for every office. All I know is that my office is run with integrity, I graduated from college a semester early because of the internship credits I earned through THE Leadership Academy with vector, I love my job, and I am currently running my own business at 23. I believe in the vector opportunity, and that’s why I am working to repair the relationship with my colleges in the area I work in because there was a manager in my area with questionable ethics here a few years ago, who, to say the least, did not serve well for the reputation of my company. However, my students (and non-students) are doing well, and I want them to be able to benefit from earning college credits from my Leadership Academy that I am currently running for 6 interns. Therefore, I will continue to repair those relationships, and give the people in my territory a good opportunity for professional growth. I just hope that my people take good notes and pay attention in my interview/training, because I would like to keep the integrity level of MY office in tact, which is why I believe in full disclosure. I wish all of you the best in your future endeavors, I don’t believe in luck…I agree with one of the many previous commentators in that success is a choice. “Luck” is when opportunity meets preparation…I give opportunities every day, and do my best to prepare them. It’s up to them whether or not they choose to succeed by using their knowledge.

    [Reply]

    Kit W Reply:

    After three days of FREE training, I was GIVEN the kit with which to do the demonstration. I did not have to pay a deposit, I did not have to buy them, they are simply on lease from the company until I decide that I do not want to sell them anymore.

    This is the same as well in the New Jersey area – I believe their policies have changed. You’re given it as a “lend” and you give it back if you decide to leave the company.

    You CAN earn money from this job; it’s not easy money or quick money – it takes time to build up, but it’s possible. I went in there feeling skeptical today after reading this, but I tried to keep an open mind, and I was impressed. They were straightforward with the payment, no gimmicks – they pay you for expanding their customer base basically.

    Payment is as follows:
    -Base Appoint Pay – $15-17 OR
    -Commission – based off of the scale that Duncan wrote.

    The average customer sales is $240 according to the presentation. Whichever earns you MORE money is the payment that they give you – ie: you get base pay or the commission and you aren’t pressured to sell (since it’s not just solely commission).

    At the office I was at – I took a picture of the all times sales that they had: (gyazo.com/688bcaee9d25f230838d6ac9011d5de1.png). For top yearly sales people, it was probably around 34k at the most, the bottom end of the list might have been around 3k or so. So, it does work for people who are willing to put in the effort.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    Again with the FREE training. You say that as if you’re getting some kind of deal. Most companies actually PAY YOU to go through training. With the deposit, perhaps things have changed after so many people complained about it. I’ll make that change in my article.

    So you’re not pressured to sell? Let’s see if you still think that if you go a few weeks with no appointments or if you do a bunch of demos and make no sales. They eventually need you to sell in order to make money.

    Sales is a tough industry to be in, that’s why the turnover rate is so high. Ever wonder why Vector recruits like crazy every summer? Yes, people who put in the effort can make money but that goes the same with selling DVD’s at the corner of a street or heck, even begging for money at a busy intersection.

    Like I stated, sales can change your life. If Vector would just advertise it as a sales job, end of discussion.

    [Reply]

    Kit W Reply:

    “Again with the FREE training. You say that as if you’re getting some kind of deal. Most companies actually PAY YOU to go through training. With the deposit, perhaps things have changed after so many people complained about it. I’ll make that change in my article.”

    I quoted this by Duncan to go on and say: This is the same as well in the New Jersey area – I believe their policies have changed. You’re given it as a “lend” and you give it back if you decide to leave the company. If you look above – I didn’t even say the free training was a bonus in my perspective; it’s a time waster if anything.

    The schedule is similar to this if you get accepted:
    Thursday – 11-4
    Friday – 11-6
    Saturday – 10-4

    You don’t necessarily need sales to make money – I could just go to a few of my friend’s houses along with my parents and give them an appointment without a sale. When you’re recruiting seniors and HS graduates, you’re not desperate for money – any extra pocket change is good; why not get the $17 per appointment by just going to a friend’s? And besides that, you could leave the company for a few months, come back later and start up again – it’s the flexibility of making appointments whenever you want – why not spend an hour of your time at a friend’s house to make $17?

    And of course you can sell DVDs or even just life insurance from door to door and make a fortune. What I basically stated in the first message is – although it is a sales job AND it isn’t the easiest job that can make you millions – you CAN make money and people have done it before as seen from the screenie. I mean, no one believed that Edison’s ediphone would sell well when he first tried to sell it – some bum (that hopped trains to get to Edison’s HQ originally to find a job with him and become partners with him) who didn’t know anything, but saw this as his opportunity to become partners with Edison started selling it and became so successful that Edison became a partner with him.

    If you do go in for the presentation/interview type of thing they have going on, you’d know that it was a sales job – and you wouldn’t have to take it if you didn’t want to. I agree with you that they should state what the job entails in the letter, but it’s not necessarily misleading – I looked this up and their actual site first before even going in. I went in skeptical (after debating whether to show up or not) and came out pretty impressed.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    Oh okay, I missed the quoting part, should’ve put it in quotes.

    As for doing presentations to your friends, you might want to double check that. From my understanding, these demos need to be done in front of “qualified” customers as I explained in the 2nd paragraph of my article or you won’t get the base pay.

    Sorry but they ARE desperate for sales, otherwise, they would just advertise their sales jobs as sales jobs and hire people who are more likely to have friends who would buy, i.e., older people with money as well as people with some sales experience.

    I’m thinking they hire students because students are more likely to accept this job due to their need of money, the fact that the job doesn’t require experience, it’s easier for a young person to call up people they know to show knives to, customers are more likely to buy to support a broke student then a middle aged guy, having a student come into people’s homes with knives is less threatening compared to some balding 40 year old, it’s apparently easy to get the addresses of graduating high school seniors to market to and since there is a high turn over rate and plenty of broke students, it’s easy for them to replace those who quit.

    [Reply]

    Kit W Reply:

    The qualified customers are people 25 years and older and working.

    You could also edit the part about the demonstration kit – I read this site before going in and had my doubts – but they don’t force you to buy their kit as well.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    I’ve already edited the demo kit info a while back. As for qualified customers, it sounds like it varies between offices. Thanks for your input.

    Just a rep Reply:

    again, you are not pressured to sell, you are encouraged and recognized for selling. The fact is in the training they discourage and will end your employment if you use any kind of pressure in the sell. The reason you “don’t make a sell” is because you aren’t playing the numbers right, yes there is the married, home owning, over 30 crowd because of all possible people they are the most likely to see the value in the forever guarantee. Sells is numbers, there are statistics that are dead on and that is with Cutco and the same with cars. The fact is if you get those that fit the 3 desired traits, you should make 6 out of 10 sells with an “average” order of 240, and it’s average because some weeks you’ll only get a 50-60 dollar sell on your 6 but then the next week you’ll get a few 1,000 sells. Like all statistics it can be flawed but when you really track it over time is usually comes out to be very true. A lot of the reps where I work track everything from numbers of call it takes to set up a demo, to how many demos they do in order to get a sell.

    also, the reason it’s mostly students is somewhat what you’ve already stated, i won’t lie about that, but there is a more important reason, statistically people that are recruited from our fliers are not only more likely to call and get hired, but they tend to work harder than those that went to monster, craigslist, or any of those other internet job boards we have job offers at.

    and as for the ads, that really is more of your locations management that is using the incorrect terminology, i will type out my local flier ad here:

    Part-time work
    $15 Base-apt
    flexible schedules (you make your schedule)
    scholarships possible (top 25 in the company receive those)
    customer sales/service (we do actually do service calls)
    no experience necessary
    all ages 17+
    conditions apply (in reference to qualified people)
    locations nationwide (there are offices everywhere.)

    Everything in the ( ) is to point out what has been pointed out before, but i just want to make sure it is understood that while it’s not printed it also in no way is deceiving, the flier is the size of a business card, there is only so much information you can put on it.

    Of course again sells is not for everyone, not at all. but the company offers a lot of positive reinforcement and encouragement. Something that was missing from the corporate jobs I had.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    encouraged, pressured… the message is for you to go out there and sell. DM’s can’t have offices full of people who aren’t doing demos. That’s one thing about sales that is great, the encouragement. Managers have an incentive to motivate their team and it benefits both sides, although, this depends on the manager.

    [Reply]

    Duncan - Gravatar
  31. Old Pro  |  June 25th, 2011 #

    This is a tough call kids. After I graduated from high school, I quit a decent construction job to go run around with a friend of mine cold calling businesses with cheap framed prints for sale. The manager had a Mercedes so I thought it must be cool. We were dead broke after a month. The manager had a newer Mercedes.

    Five years later I was in a jam. Married, first kid on the way, and no job. I answered what was essentially the same kind of ad out of the newspaper for an odd sort of “job” – selling carpet cleaning. Lots of appointments each week working cheap jobs for people with no money just in hopes of finding a real “plum” every once in a while. 100% commission. I never lied to people, never high pressured them, and always gave them more than they paid for. Three years later I managed an entire state. Seven years after that, I bought the entire company.

    I went on through my late thirties and then forties building a restaurant, a wholesale company, a manufacturer’s rep agency, and finally a small time land developer. The fact is, I haven’t been “employed” for over 20 years and have made a small fortune.

    Sales work is not for everyone. But lets face it, selling something, a product, a service, an idea, really is selling yourself; and this is a skill that, honed over time, will last you a lifetime. Because later in your lives, you wont be selling cutlery. You’ll be selling real estate or computer software or missile guidance systems or surgical instruments, or whatever. And perhaps it was an opportunity like this one that got you going. Remember, in the world of capitalism, no product or service ever moves anywhere without it being sold. I’m here to tell you that the dope that makes the product isn’t the one getting rich.

    One last thought. It may seem that a commission sales position is risky. But ask yourself this question: Will a standard wage paying employer just LET you earn more money when you need to? Just GIVE you over time because you have more bills to pay? Will your boss just HAND you a raise because you have worked harder than everyone else and he agrees that you need a better car? Hell no. But commission sales positions are like little rocket ships that are powered by your own self determination and will power. The sky is the limit and you are the pilot. The more prospects you turn, the more money you make.

    Its the American way.

    Now who can argue with that? Go get ‘em.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    Sweet success story. Thanks for sharing. As I said in the post, sales can literally bring a person from broke to rich. It’s the highest paying profession but at the same time, it’s also one of the toughest so like you said, it’s not for everyone.

    For others reading this, one thing that will help is to sell products or services that you truly believe in. Your natural enthusiasm for what you’re selling will help a lot.

    Another option is to get a sales job that pays a base salary in addition to commission. The base will typically be low but it will at least reduce your stress during down months when your sales isn’t going so well.

    When you’re living at home with your parents and have no bills to pay, 100% commission isn’t so bad but when you have a mortgage and a family to take care of, it can be quite stressful.

    You can learn a lot from sales such as self motivation, determination, perseverance, and the value of a hard earned dollar. The problem is that most of these students are looking for an hourly paid summer job to save up for things like tuition and books. Going into an interview thinking it’s a regular paid job and finding it’s sales has gotten many people a bit annoyed to say the least.

    If Vector would just advertise this as a sales job, there probably wouldn’t even be any comments on this post.

    [Reply]

    Old Pro - Gravatar
  32. Brian  |  June 28th, 2011 #

    VECTOR: THE GOOD, BAD, AND UGLY.

    So, like many of you I got I call about an “amazing opportunity” that payed $17 per hour. Also like many of you I am questioning this “wonderful opportunity.” Yesterday evening I got a phone call by a young women who asked if I was interested in a job opportunity that payed $17 an hour. I was extremely excited and told her I was definitely interested. She told me that I was recommended by my good friend Javi for the job (mind you I have no idea who Javi is). But I thought to myself, “I have no idea who the hell this Javi guy is but quite frankly I don’t care because this is a freakin great opportunity.” I mean, how many Sophomores in college do you know that make $17 an hour during the summer?

    Later that night I talked to my friend Lynda about the call and she said, “please don’t tell that this job is for a company called Vector.” She told that the ad was completely misleading, the company targets poor college students like myself, and that I should research the company.

    After this conversation I decided to take matter into my hands and actually research Vector to see what the company is all about. I typed in Vector into google and the third top page searched was this page entitled “Vector Marketing Scam 2011.” I read all 40 comments and now I’m torn. Part of me wants to just stay home and not waste my time while my other half is dying to go up to the office and expose these people for their misleading marketing tactics.

    Once I finished my research I decided to do what I normally do when I have a problem: talk to my mom. She and I sat down and I asked her if she thought it was a scam she responded by asking me questions. She asked could I explain what the job entails. I could not. She then asked, could I explain what position I was being interviewed for. I could not. She finally asked, could I explain how I found out about the job. I could. I told her how I received a phone call from a woman and was recommended by this Javi character who I do not know personally nor how he got my number seeing as how it is NOT on facebook.

    Needless to say I became clouded with doubt so I decided to call Vector myself about an hour ago. I talked to some receptionist who had worked at Vector for the past year. I called in and told him thank you for opportunity but no thanks. I told him how I read about Vector online and decided this was not the job for me. Following this, the receptionist began to question why I was no longer interested in the job and claimed that a lot of the posts online about Vector are misleading and falsified which I can agree with to some degree. The title of this page is a bit misleading in the same way that Vector is. (No offense Kai.) However, I still had my reservations and for good reason. I told the guy that I am not interested in door-to-door advertising and he told me that that was not the case. I told him that I am not a fan of being paid by commission and he told me that that was also not the case. The guy then said that Javi recommended me and Javi, who had only been working with Vector for three days if we include today), has proven to have great insight and is already making bonuses. He then told me that I, like good ol’ Javi, could be making bonuses as well. He said that I just from hearing me over the phone he could tell that I would be perfect for the job. (I would hope that to be perfect for this amazing job opportunity you need more skills than simply being an articulate American).

    I responded to all this by simply saying that if I had mistaken Vector then he should correct me. I said, explain to me what the job entails if I am wrong about the organization. He then told me that he, like many receptionist at Vector, do not explain what the organization is about over the phone but prefer to do so in person when you come out for the interview. I responded by saying that I have never heard of an organization that could sum up a job description in a nutshell or had no elevator speech prepared. He grudgingly responded by asking if I honestly expected him to explain to me what Vector was in thirty seconds. I told him that actually, I did not expect him to and that if he had seven minutes to explain to me why I should come in today for my interview that he should be able to take roughly seven minutes to explain to me what a job at Vector entails.

    His final response was, “Well actually I don’t have the time but I really would like to see you today for your interview and if you decide you don’t want the job then you can still gain interview skills.” This conversation made me lose all of the little faith that I had in Vector.

    I hope that everyone who reads this is intelligent enough to know that you go to an interview to further apply to a job that you know about and are interested in, you DO NOT go to an interview for the “interview experience” or to discover what the job is.

    There are plenty jobs that we can apply for. I am currently looking for one and reading Spanish novels on the side to prepare for next semester. If you cannot find a job then volunteer or simply educate yourself for next semester. Have a great summer and when thinking of potential organizations to work for make sure that the organization embodies integrity.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    That’s the thing with sales jobs, they typically don’t go into too much detail over the phone because let’s face it, most people don’t want to do sales… although, most sales jobs would at least say what they sell.

    Since you read all of the comments, you pretty much know what this job is all about. You’ll be selling knives based on referrals. If you actually sell a bunch of knives, you can make some decent money. You should decide whether or not to go to the interview base what you now know about Vector.

    As for my title being “misleading”, well, people searching for “vector marketing scam” wants to know whether or not it’s a scam and any other information they can get and that’s what this page is about. As for 2011, all of the comments are from this year, so that’s correct too. Just saying :) Thanks for your input by the way.

    [Reply]

    Brian - Gravatar
  33. Laura  |  June 28th, 2011 #

    I have a job interview tonight, but after reading this I’m not sure if I should even show up. The receptionist was very misleading and I’m disappointed with the way they presented the job to me. On the other hand, I already work part time and the chance to make some extra money wouldn’t hurt. Any thoughts?

    [Reply]

    Laura - Gravatar
  34. Kai S.  |  June 28th, 2011 #

    In my opinion, since you know what this job really is after reading what’s on this page and are still wondering whether or not to go, you should just give the interview a shot. Worse case scenario, you waste an hour of two but at least you’ll never have to wonder. Who knows, maybe you’ll be great at selling knives and if that’s the case, all of their misleading info wouldn’t even matter. That and you can share your experience about your interview here :)

    Remember that it’s only irritating when you go into the interview thinking one thing but it turns out to be something else. However, if you read my post as well as the comments, you should have a really good idea what this job is about and therefore shouldn’t be surprised at anything. In this case, just focus on whether or not you’d enjoy doing presentations and selling knives.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. - Gravatar
  35. Mr.White  |  June 28th, 2011 #

    Why not just apply for a position at your local car dealership? In the long run, this sounds a lot like select staffing, and other semi-cruddy seasonal jobs.

    [Reply]

    Mr.White - Gravatar
  36. Haha  |  June 29th, 2011 #

    Okay, I’m quitting.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    If you already went through training, you might as well try to make some money.

    [Reply]

    Haha - Gravatar
  37. Curious and Furious  |  July 1st, 2011 #

    So I went to the interview and was absolutely disgusted. The people running it were merely children. The environment was dirty and unprofessional to say the least. The manager was wearing a badly put together outfit and he spoke too fast for human comprehension. I was accepted with little contemplation, and I felt like I wasn’t given proper consideration. His decision seemed like it was on whim (or perhaps desperate need for employees?) and it was a little crushing in the self-esteem department. The worst part of the whole experience was that he took time…TOOK the TIME…to ANSWER his cell phone at LEAST six times DURING the interview. The nerve of that boy! And yes, I am younger than him, but he displayed behavior of a mindless middle-school brat. I turned the job down, and gave terrible reviews when I was sent a survey from the company. I would wish the worst of luck on the company, but that would be childish. So best of luck Vector, and please, keep in mind who you promote to district manager next time.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    Thanks for sharing your experience. Since most of their recruits are students, it’s not surprising that a manager can be so young. Now answering a cell phone while giving an interview, well, that’s just unprofessional.

    [Reply]

    Just a rep Reply:

    I am not trying to justify what happened, however, if he was just given his promotion, and thus just got his office (which DM’s have to find and lease themselves) what could have happened is he doesn’t have enough qualified employee’s to be assistant managers, which means unless he was taking personal calls, those calls were from reps in the field calling to check-in or see if they can’t get a deal to make a final sell. That said which is more unprofessional, answer the phone in an interview, or letting a potential sell go because you don’t want to insult someone who may or may not take the job.

    Again, not defending him, but it’s unfair to judge someone and the whole company by one bad experience that may have just been the way it is if he just opened said office. I know vector tries to do their best to help out their new DM’s with staffing and locations, but there is only so much they do and it’s up to the DM to do the rest.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    I get what you mean but it’s still unprofessional.

    [Reply]

    Robert Reply:

    I have actually had to call my DM many times to make a sell because he is the one who can really help . The DM job is to make sure that the reps get what they need so if u have a problem with it maybe u should call your boss when there is a problem he might be in a interveiw

    [Reply]

    Curious and Furious - Gravatar
  38. ScottN  |  July 25th, 2011 #

    I had a similar experience with Vector. It just seems shady to even work for a company where the credability is questioned so much. Also, it seems like a lot of people that work for them are “sheep” so to speak. The defend the company and won’t admit any faults to the company. Every job has its pros and cons, so I highly doubt the “Sheep” like every aspect to the job. The interview I went to was more out of curiousity than anything as I already make a decent income working for the hospital. They required no signature, no social, and the whole interview just felt fake. The floors were ridden with dirt and gnats were everywhere! The manager seemed to be a nice enough guy though. The interview was very informal and I was not even asked to produce a resume. It honestly felt more like what one would expect of Apple or Microsoft when they have the confrences to release new products. He had an ipod in the corner of the room playing a bunch of poppy music, like he was trying to hype us up along with a power point slideshow. Now I’m not saying I’m scared of being a salesman or I’d make a bad salesman, but I am saying that if I choose to go that route that I would invest my future in a more credible company. I called after my interview to opt out of the “free” training and not take the job. I asked the receptionist about the bad rap Vector gets from the internet and about the several lawsuits against them and she got very very defensive and bitchy, and that was the end of the conversation.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    Thanks for sharing your experience Scott. You’re right. If you want to get into sales, why not just go work for a company that doesn’t have a bad reputation. To be fair to Vector Marketing though, they have changed how they run their business over the years to be less of a turn off to people. Also, the cheerleaders of Vector are usually the ones who actually make money so it’s hard to blame them. In their mind, if they can sell knives, anyone can, even though this isn’t true and that’s why they have such a high turnover rate and have to continually hire new reps all the time.

    [Reply]

    Just a rep Reply:

    I couldn’t agree more, so again as it has been said but apparently no one reads into it. SALES IS NOT FOR EVERYONE. The job might not be a good fit for you, but that is not an excuse to bash it. That is where we “cheerleaders” are getting angry over the comments. The fact is the only people, THE ONLY PEOPLE, who have anything bad to say about vector are the one’s who didn’t even try (didn’t even go through training) or those that didn’t even try to do the job (literally didn’t care to do the work).

    It’s not for everyone, but that doesn’t mean you need to knock it or call it shady. Fact is Vector has been in business over 60 years, and when it comes to the customers that have purchased the knives you will never find someone that says they regret buying the knives, or hate them.

    The fact is simply this, the only way you should consider this a full-time job that pays all your bills is if you make it a full-time job to pay all your bills, on average it takes 10 calls to make one demo, out of 10 demos you are likely to get 6 sells, and each sell is roughly 240. so for the 1440 cpo (the amount by which you multiple your current commission to get your pay) you have to have spent at least 10 hours doing demos and having had made at least 100 calls to get those demos. You want the job to pay the bills you need to do more demos, and make more calls, and hopefully sell more. If you want stability and not having to actually work very hard get a job at wal-mart or mcdonalds, it really is just that simple.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    Well, vector isn’t the only sales job. There are many sales job that are more lucrative and pay more. But anyway, you’re right, sales isn’t for everyone but also, even if someone wants to be in sales, Vector isn’t for everyone either.

    [Reply]

    ScottN - Gravatar
  39. Lee  |  August 3rd, 2011 #

    From my experience, Vector is not a scam. It’s just a really rough sales job and believe me the sales rate is no where near 60%!
    They target young kids because most of their sales comes from friends and relatives of these kids buying expensive knives to support their little Timmy trying hard to make money. I’m sure there are many successful sales person for them, but if you think about it, the real reason they continually go after kids is because those are probably the most lucrative targets for the company.
    Their quality is actually quite inferior to the top brands such as Hienkles. And you know the point about life time replacement? Well any high priced cutlery offers the same thing as Cutco, most people just don’t know it. Also no one actually pays full price retail for high quality cutlery! You can get a nice set of German knives that are better than Cutco at Costco for about 200 bux! Knowing that I can’t really tell others that Cutco is such a bargain with a straight face.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    Thanks for your comment Lee. You’re right and that’s exactly why students are their target market for their sales team. I wonder what percentage of their sales force is over 25 years old.

    [Reply]

    Just a rep Reply:

    Wow, so when you say Hienkles do you mean REAL Hienkles, or the made in china Hienkles? you won’t get real Hienkles for 200 dollars. and your “life time replacement” comment is also wrong, read the description on the Hienkles “life time warrenty against defects” and in legal terms “life time” means the life of the product not of you. and inferior …. 440a high carbon stainless steel, vs high carbon steel? I am not saying Hienkles is a bad brand by any means, i respect the company and they do produce a high quality knife, but honestly Cutco knives are of a higher quality. Did you know in order to keep your Hienkles sharp you need to sharpen them after every use, don’t believe me? read their the insert you get when you open the box, under the care for the product. The forever guarantee is literally that, it’s not your lifetime, or the “lifetime” of the product, it’s forever, your great grand kids can still get them replaced if you want, or your neighbor who you decided needed a knife more than you needed it. The fact is of the matter is I find most of your post to be from someone who does not own either real Hienkles or Cutco, but Hienkles is more for those that know how to properly sharpen a knife … and who don’t mind having to pay for it to be professionally done once the blade has reached the point where the owner can no longer sharpen it themselves.

    just a little factoid: there are only 3 real Hienkles brands that are Hienkles, and around 11 that use the Hienkles name, but are not made with nearly the same precision or high quality materials as the actually brand. But enjoy your 200 dollar set, call up one of Vectors rep and let them do a demo, our Cutco vs. your 200 “Hienkles”

    [Reply]

    Lee - Gravatar
  40. Boo!  |  August 27th, 2011 #

    Well, I got called for the job, and was very excited about it! But after readin all this I have changed my mind about going into the 3 day training, I realy feel I can sell these knifes like nothing, but if you have read some of these blog posts they suck you in so you sell to your family first, and than your friends parents, and so on, and so forth. When I walked in the place they where all pretty young in there also! Seemed like a good job to be don’t get me wrong, but the manager was realy young, and acted like a robot! I read on some of the posts, and why do they answer there cell phone?? During the interview procces?? Kinda weird the guy wasent even talking to anyone, well this place just sucks you in, and I don’t like it! F this marketing BS there not gonna drag me into there sales scheme! I will have no part in this!

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    That’s the whole point of selling these knives this way, to have people sell to their “network”. I don’t think selling knives door to door to strangers would work very well. Anyway, if you think you can sell knives like nothing, just give it a shot and see what happens.

    [Reply]

    Boo! - Gravatar
  41. Kevin  |  August 30th, 2011 #

    I just had an interview today and got the job. the other two guys that were trying to get a job there today did not, and they really wanted it too. Not sure why so many people are telling me this is a scam all of a sudden, when it very clearly seems to be legit. Yes they said $17 an hour + comission on the phone. So yea, I get that was a lie. but getting $14 an appt or comission (if it comes out to be more than you made per appt.) is still a hell of a lot better than sitting at home unemployed as I’ve been for months. Plus all the supplies like the knives and everything are being given to me for free so I can sell them. And I have no problem selling things door to door with complete strangers as it is anyway, which I’m not even being asked to do really… so what’s really the problem here? I don’t see any yet.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    Simple, the problem is that people come into the interview thinking one thing and having it turn out to be something else. Did you know you were going to be selling knives to friends and family and not get paid by the hour? Yes, they pay by appointment but only to qualified prospects.

    I know getting something is better than nothing as you stated but you got lied to. You even said it. It seems like they misrepresented the facts to get you into an interview according to what you’re saying. You were unemployed and desperate so of course you’re willing to just brush that off but many people aren’t. See the problem now?

    As I stated, all Vector has to do is to be clear with their job description and no one would call them a scam or anything. It’s a commission based sales job, they should just be upfront with that.

    The important thing is that you are excited and got the job. Since you’re fine with how the business is operated, my advice is to aim to be the best salesperson in your office. Get tips from the top sellers, learn all you can about your product, o into every demo with enthusiasm for what you’re selling, and be persistent. Achieve that and you’ll make a lot of money. Good luck.

    [Reply]

    Just a rep Reply:

    just one comment because I’ve seen you mention it more than once. The fact is simply this about vector. Because advertising comes from the local DM’s office, not all ads are the same, and that is a shame, everything they teach you is show the knives, answer the questions, the knives sell themselves. You are not asked to do high pressure selling, you are not asked to do door-to-door or cold calling, again these actions can have your employment with the company terminated because of the way the business works that is bad for everyone. The reason they say $XX dollars an appointment (or with the misleading /hour) is that the point of the job is to have people experience the knives, and keep the pressure off the rep from having to push a sell. how many sells jobs do you know pay you a base wage to show a product? Saying it’s a sells job isn’t 100% accurate either because of the fact that it’s no pressure. The idea behind the base pay is to allow you to see people that wouldn’t buy and at the very least expand your network so that you don’t run out of people to show knives too and possibly make commission. The top reps aren’t the ones that do the pressure selling, they are the ones that use and love the product for what it is, and it’s that enthusiasm for the product that often induces as sell.

    my DM says this all the time “the definition of a sale is the transference of enthusiasm from one person to another.” Car salesmen that have gotten jobs have commented on how different the model is, because on the car lot they are pushed to not only prejudge someone, but to push the sell, and Vector discourages both. I like my job because i believe everyone should have Cutco, and so long as you are not stealing it from your family and friends I really don’t care who you buy it from.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    Honestly, anyone in sales working for any company can have the same mentality. They aren’t a “salesrep”. They’re guides or consultants who’s only job is to answer questions. Seriously though, if you have any scripted rebuttals to every objection customers can throw at you, that’s still considered pressure to a certain extent. Again, it just comes down to how you view your job but the reality is that you’re in the business of convincing people that your products are worth the cost.

    [Reply]

    Kevin - Gravatar
  42. Brandon  |  August 30th, 2011 #

    It is so funny listening to all of you naysayers out there!! Everyone keeps saying this is just a commission sales job. With a sales commission job, if you don’t sell anything, then you get NOTHING AT ALL!! With Vector, if you don’t get anything then you still get paid $15 for the interview that you provided to the customer!! With Vector, there are two different ways that you can get paid! The first way is by commission and the second way is by the interviews. At the end of the week, you get paid whichever amount is the highest!! Sometimes people will have bad weeks but still do 10-20 interviews!! Vector makes it very convenient because most sales jobs pay just by commission so you always have to be selling something!! Also, when you get to certain points, your commission percentage goes up! You start making 15% of all sales and then it goes up from there!! I am a college student and wasn’t working at all and just got hired with Vector. It does suck that you do not get paid from the training but it makes up for it in the long run!! Also, for college students, it is extremely easy to plan around your schedule. If you don’t want to do many interviews in one week then that’s fine. If you want to do 50 in a week then that is fine as well!! In today’s economy, making $15 for 40-50 minutes of your time is hard, especially a part-time job!! I am graduating in December of this year and I am even planning on keeping my job at Vector just with how well I can plan my own hours!!! You are also gaining very valuable experience and getting something that looks great on your resume!! Also, for those of you who do not like to try or work hard at your jobs then no, this is not the job for you! You have to have great enthusiasm and good motivation to be successful with this job. You will be much better working at McDonald’s where you care less about what you do and how little you make! It’s funny to see people compare this to a scam. A scam is a ripoff to where you would work or put money into something and not get anything in return. You can be paid very well with this job plus it is a very professional company!! I wonder what looks better on a resume, a job at McDonalds or a very successful Sales Company? It is funny also because while some of you idiots working at McDonald’s making $8 max for 10 hours, I will be making your total pay of the day for only 5 hours of work!! Haha, best luck to y’all, y’all will definitely need it!!

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    There are sales jobs out there with base pay so not all are fully commission based. Yes, Vector pays per “qualified” demos BUT, the way many offices advertise, people coming into the interview are led to believe it’s an hourly wage job. That’s the reason why some people call it a scam.

    As I’ve said, all Vector has to do is be up front with their job ads and all will be well with people. At least people applying for McDonald’s know exactly what the job is about. With Vector, you don’t know even know you’re going to be selling knives.

    As for the time flexibility “advantage”, that’s not an advantage because ANY commission sales job gives you that flexibility. If you don’t work, you don’t make money. Simple.

    I know you’re just defending your company and that’s cool, but calling people idiots who are just trying to work to earn some money to get by makes Vector sales reps seem obnoxious, uneducated, and unprofessional.

    By the way, Vector is not a successful sales company, they’re a successful marketing company since they’ve figured out a way to sell expensive knives (by getting college students to sell to their friends and family.) Now that’s genius.

    [Reply]

    Brandon Reply:

    As I said Kai, this is a challenging job that you have to work at. It is not for anyone who doesn’t value effort in the workplace. And you are wrong, the time flexibility is a huge advantage, especially for college students!! If you want to go home for the weekend or go see a friend for a weekend or whatever, the great thing is you can. Other jobs you get started with put you on schedules where sometimes it is hard to get away. When you ask for a day off or for some time off starting at a new company, sometimes they view that as laziness and as you not taking your job seriously. I know being a college student myself that sometimes classes get in the way to where you are too tired by the end of the day to work, so you have that luxury of not having to. You have your own freedom and that is what college students love to have. I have several friends who work for the company as well who are in college and they all enjoy it. You make it what it is. If you want to work hard and do 20 interviews a week then you can. If you want to do 3-5 then you can. Also, I might add, Vector was founded in 1949 and is still running today. I don’t know how you can say that they are not a successful company but say what you wish. They also have around $200,000,000 annually in sales and that speaks volumes considering the economy that we are living in now today. I would not say that Vector is a full-time type of job but for college students who are not working this is a perfect opportunity to earn really good money that doesn’t take away all your time everyday like most jobs do!

    Also there is no me “defending” the company that I just started working for. I understand that not everyone is going to like the company and what it stands for as it is impossible to get everyone to agree all on one thing. I have been familiar with Vector for around 7 years having friends working there and also buying some knives myself. The Cutco brand is by far the best types of knives available for purchase and they literally sell themselves!

    I will also add that they are upfront, at least the office that I am employed with they were. They said that the pay was $15 an hour. In your case you can say that they were wrong and not upfront because when you do a demo for a household, it takes only around 35-45 minutes. Which if you want to be technical about it, your making $15 dollars in less than an hour.

    Like I said, this company is not for everyone, especially for those that try to find the bad in anything. You have to be positive and have good selling experience. They also have several opportunities for you to learn and get better with sales for those that do not have all that much experience with selling.

    I can respect your decision on not liking the company but for those of you who are getting on here and spreading information that you do not know is true is just rediculous. I even love the title above stated “Vector Marketing Scam.” It seems like the only thing the internet is used for now a days is to go online and spread false information and blow off steam….pity!

    [Reply]

    Brandon Reply:

    I also thought that your last paragraph “By the way, Vector is not a successful sales company, they’re a successful marketing company since they’ve figured out a way to sell expensive knives (by getting college students to sell to their friends and family.) Now that’s genius.” was absolutely hysterical! You say that Vector is not a successful sales company but then go on to say that they’ve figured out a way to sell expensive knives and then even credit them by saying “that’s genius”. You astound me!

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    I couple of things. I said the time flexibility isn’t an advantage to be highlighting in the world of SALES. I’ve been in sales before and if I wanted to take time off, I could. Why? Because if I don’t work and sell, they don’t have to pay me. Compared to a regular job that’s an advantage yes, but I was talking about the sales field in general.

    As for the $15 per hour claim, well, that’s one of the reasons why there are so many comments about this. Ask 10 people what they think $15 per hour means and all 10 will say you get paid $15 every hour. And no, you don’t get paid $15 for doing a demo and not selling anything. You only get paid if the demos are done in front of qualified people. Another thing, travel time isn’t included and some demos can go over 1 hour long. Are you telling me from the time you get in the car to the time you get back home on average is less than an hour?

    I’m not against the company because I know that with most sales jobs, you can literally have your financial life changed for the better if you’re good at it. On top of that, you can learn a lot of valuable skills such as determination, persistence, speaking, creating rapport, selling, etc. The main problem is just how they aren’t upfront when it comes to their job ads.

    As for your “vector is a sales company” comment, if you want to talk semantics, they’re a marketing company. There’s a difference. After all, their name is Vector MARKETING.

    [Reply]

    Brandon Reply:

    Actually you do get $15 for each demo presentation. Of course the person you are doing it for has to be “qualified” but that just means they have to be 25 years of age or older and have a job. You wouldn’t want to be going around anyways and trying to sell to your college friends because 90-95% of the time they won’t buy anything. But yes you do get paid $15 per demo that you do for people, so even if your bad at selling and do not sell much, you’ll be making at least $15 per demo you do. And yes, if you want to be literal about it, they are a marketing company but your JOB DESCRIPTION is selling knives! I’m guessing you had a really bad experience with Vector or just didn’t get hired!

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    I never said you didn’t, but you DON’T get paid $15 per HOUR which is what many students assume coming into the interview. You didn’t touch on the fact that including travel time, it takes more than an hour to complete a demo.

    If you want to be literal, I said they are a genius marketing company because they found a way to sell the knives using students. Just for your info, you can compare marketing to a general and sales to the troops. The general’s job is to figure out a way to spread the word about the company to the public. They send their troops out to do the actual sales. Sales and marketing are two different actions.

    [Reply]

    Just a rep Reply:

    I’m sorry to but in yet again, but if a demo is longer than an hour and you are not making a sell you are doing something horribly wrong. A no sell demo will be 35-45minuets. and since most of the time you are not traveling to other cities your commute usually is 30-40minuets so you can make a bit more or a bit less than 15 an hour, but in every case the base pay is entirely in control of the rep.

    and those demos that go over said hour (sell’s usually take about an hour and a half or more sometimes) you are making over the base 15 (because again if you are selling that little it shouldn’t take you more than 20minuets) so even in that scenario when it’s the sell that is taking the time you should be coming out with at least 30 dollars when you are brand new (at least that’s how mine went) and for 1.5 hours + travel it’s still about 15 an hour (more or less again because of other factors)

    now about that per hour comment, when you work for a corporation you don’t know what your hours will be, often they will ask you to leave early or stay later, you don’t always have a fixed schedule, and if they put you into slot A but you have something set up for slot A you get to choose between money and keeping your job or losing out on going to the event. I am also not sure what kind of sells you did, but not all sells positions allow you flexibility, since often you need to be at a location for X hours.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    Of course not all sales jobs allow flexibility but many do and because of that, mentioning it as a benefit of working for Vector is a moot point. I think it would just be better if the company says $15 per appointment and just take out the whole per hour idea all together. Some will go way over an hour with travel time to and from the customer’s home included. Minus gas and it’s under $15 per appt. People would feel less misled if the hour thing was taken out.

    [Reply]

    Brandon Reply:

    Also its exactly what Old Pro said above!!

    “One last thought. It may seem that a commission sales position is risky. But ask yourself this question: Will a standard wage paying employer just LET you earn more money when you need to? Just GIVE you over time because you have more bills to pay? Will your boss just HAND you a raise because you have worked harder than everyone else and he agrees that you need a better car? Hell no. But commission sales positions are like little rocket ships that are powered by your own self determination and will power. The sky is the limit and you are the pilot. The more prospects you turn, the more money you make.”

    This just goes to show how convenient the job actually is! You can hardly ever get any overtime hours at your work or extra pay. You can do that every single day if you wish working at Vector or any other sales/advertising company. The sky is the limit!

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    If you read any of my other comments on sales, I’ve stated several times that it can change your life for the better. Again, this isn’t about selling knives, it’s about how Vector misrepresents what the job really is on their ads when recruiting college students.

    Anyway, you seem to have a lot of passion for this company so I’m sure you will do well. Good luck with everything and thanks for the input.

    [Reply]

    Brandon - Gravatar
  43. Mina  |  September 2nd, 2011 #

    This is ridiculous. I have made more money with Vector than I have with any other company. Please do something more productive with your time than complaining about a great opportunity. Thank you.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    And how many other companies have you worked for and for how long? Someone who’s worked at McDonald’s for 10 years can say he’s made more money with McDonald’s than another other job he had. That means nothing. I’m sure you’re making good money with Vector but if that’s the case, please do something more productive with your time, like sell more knives, than searching for and commenting on sites that don’t fully agree with how Vector operates. Thank you.

    [Reply]

    Brandon Reply:

    Kai dude, just back off and chill!!

    This whole blog is ridiculous because the title of the thing is “Vector Marketing Scam!” Let’s first look at this and really ask ourselves what the word “Scam” means! At webster.com the definition states that scam means “A fraudulent or deceptive act of operation.” There is NO scam here whatsoever!! This whole blog is about “they go after college kids, blah blah blah.” I had 3 college students come in today, who actually attend the same university that I am attending, and talk for about a minute about how successful they have been in the company and what their total career sales was. I will say that each of them was over $10,000 and they hadn’t worked there long at all!! My branch manager is ONLY 23 and he can already basically retire in the next 4-5 years if he liked!! There are hundreds of other people that are in the same situation as him!! People work at Vector part time and full time! Yes you sell to your own people but seriously, I guess if you’re mad with that then you’re just upset that you hardly know anyone. This is the easiest and greatest job!! The best part about it is, the knives sell themselves and we have an average of 50% sales rate per demo we do! It just really aggravates the hell out of me when someone talks so much about something and they haven’t experienced it or have no knowledge of it at all!! The Cutco company is based out of Olean, New York and it’s population in Olean is about 16,000 people. Out of those 16,000, about 1,000 of those people work for Cutco! Cutco is an extremely successful brand of knives and has the best quality out there whenever it comes to knives! For anyone who has an interview and is thinking about wanting to work for them and are getting swayed back and fourth from these idiots that have no clue how Vector is, do not let them do that to you!! In my training program, there is also a man who is about 65 years old and who is retired. For 30 years, he went around to hospitals selling surgical equipment. He said that if he ever got interviews with people and saw Vector Marketing on their resume, that he would hire them automatically!!! This man was also a customer of my branch managers for 15 years and it is soooo successful that he came out of retirement to work here himself! That speaks wonders!! These stories I have told you are completely true and just goes to show how professional and successful Vector Marketing is! If you are these naysayers who say otherwise then you have no clue what you are talking about and need to go and get a job instead of writing false reviews on company’s every single day!!! It’s time to grow up my friend!

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    First off, let me highlight two of your statements for the public to read:

    1. Your branch manager is 23 and can retire within the next 4-5 years.

    2. HUNDREDS of people in Vector are in the same position, being able to retire within 4-5 years.

    Let’s analyze this. In order to retire (not needing to work anymore) within the next 4-5 years, these HUNDREDS of people will either:

    a) Make millions of dollars.
    b) Die at a relatively young age.
    c) “Retire” and eventually live in a van down by the river.
    d) Will not be retiring because you don’t really know what it takes to retire.

    Logic says that you will choose A. So you’re basically saying that hundreds of people in their 20′s are going to be multi-millionaires within the next 4-5 years. Now since Vector has been around for over 50 years, that means that literally THOUSANDS of people have made MILLIONS of dollars before the age of 30 by working for Vector Marketing.

    Wow! I never knew that!

    Side note: You’re wrong. I never once stated that Vector is a scam. My title is more of the topic in which I discussed in my article but if you actually read my article and all of my comments, I never once said that Vector is a scam. Some of the people who have commented might of called Vector a scam but I didn’t. Don’t mix up what I say and what other people have said. Please let me know what info in the actual article is false so I can review and change it if necessary.

    Anyway, now that I know that Vector is responsible for creating thousands of young millionaires, here is what I have to say: For anyone reading this and is considering joining Vector, DO IT! If THOUSANDS of people have become millionaires with Vector, SO CAN YOU!!!

    So what if they sort of mislead people with the job postings? If they didn’t, most people wouldn’t come into the interview and get a chance to become a millionaire.

    You’ve convinced me Brandon. Vector is awesome in my book. Bravo.

    Bottom line: Join Vector and make millions and retire before 30.

    [Reply]

    Brandon Reply:

    And once again, you’ve shown your ass on here to everyone like you have done the whole entire blog. I am not going to stoop down to your level and argue your idiotic comments that you post. I have no clue why you say that are “misleading” when each demo you do for customers you get $15. A demo takes less than an hour so I guess they mislead people in a good way by giving them $15 for less than an hour. Man, what assholes!

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    What do you mean? I recommended that people join Vector because they will become millionaires by the time they are 30. You don’t agree with that?

    If you have no clue why I and tons of other people say their job postings are misleading then I don’t know what else to say. People complain because they were led to believe it is an hourly wage job. As for demos being less than an hour, sure, some are, but you have to count travel time as well. It’s still your time you’re spending.

    Thanks for the name calling, really shows your maturity.

    [Reply]

    Christine Reply:

    Hey HERE IS THE THING GO DRAMMA QUEEN AND KING..HEY DRAMMA MAMMA AND THIS IS WUT BUSSINESS IS RIGHT…DRAMMA…PERSONALLY I DO NOT SEE WHERE THERE IS A VECTOR CUTCO SCAM…I SEE THAT THIS CORPORATION IS GIVING PEOPLE WITH REAL SKILL AND TALENT AN OPPORTUNITY TO USE THEM IN THERE LIFE TIME AND AT THE SAME TIME TO REALLY KNOW WHAT IT IS LIKE TO EARN A LIVING…I THINK WHAT THIS CORPORATION IS DOING IS A GOOD THING…THE REST OF YOU THAT HAVE BAD AND NEGATIVE COMMENTS ABOUT THIS..WHAT IS YOUR REAL EXPERIENCE..THOSE OF YOU THAT DO NOT HAVE CONFIDENCE IN YOUR SELF TO TO THE JOB THEN APPLY AND YOU WILL GET THAT OR DONT APPLY WISH YOU DID LATER IN YOUR LIFE…AND THE PERSON WHO WROTE THIS WEBSITE.. REMEMBER WHEN YOU POINT ONE FINGER TO SOMEONE OR SOMETHING THERE IS THREE POINT RIGHT BACK AT YOU..HAVE GREAT DAY…CHRISTINE P

    Kai S. Reply:

    Thanks for yelling.

    By the way, you might want to read the actual article. I never call Vector a scam. The only thing I point out that is negative is how their advertising for job openings is a bit misleading and even some people who work for Vector agree.

    So who’s right? I’m pointing at you but wait, there are 3 fingers pointing at me so I guess I win :p

    Mina - Gravatar
  44. Brett  |  September 5th, 2011 #

    I just quit working for “Vector Marketing” as a “receptionist”. Firstly, the environment was DISGUSTING. The floor looked as though it had not been vacuumed in five years, the desks were falling apart, and there was garbage everywhere. As a receptionist, I was forced to make calls from a standard, wireless home-phone, which would many times link calls and drop them.

    What was worse was the script: I was given a three-page script, typed in different fonts, with numerous types and misspelled words. It was very difficult to read, and pretty much mislead those whom I would be reading it to. These people were “recommended” by new salesmen for a sales position. But these original salesmen, many of them only 17, were told that they had to provide a list of recommendations as a job requirement. So, they many times just pulled random numbers. This way the company can say that the people we were calling were recommended when they were really just pulled out of a phone book. While calling them to try and get these poor people to come to a job interview, we so-called receptionists were forced to lie to them about the pay they would receive and just how exclusive their job was. The exact script says:

    “So just to fill you in a bit, We are a Nationally ranked company called Franchise, and pretty much what we have available are very flexible schedules in entry evel customer sales, and customer service. We work in the house ware industry along with some sporting accessories. And with this position we actually start your pay at SEVENTEEN DOLLAR$, which isn’t based on your results and it is guaranteed no what what!! So your pretty much just working with out customers and answering any questions they may have. So its really simple and you get paid 17 bucks starting out so its not too bad. Also just so you know, there is NO telemarketing or door to door sales involved with out position at all. And lastly what’s really great abut the position is that NO experience is required, because we do offer FULL training if you are accepted for the position!”

    Although, it is NOT $17 an hour, but $17 per “appointment” or sometimes simply by day. And worse, if the person we were talking to assumed that the pay was $17/hr, then we were told not to correct them, but to allow them to continue thinking about the great pay-off so that they would be more inclined to go to the “interview”. This would also be a good time to mention that these interviews are group interviews which last a LONG TIME. But not because they actually talk to you, but so that you can spend an annoying amount of time watching demonstrations and PowerPoint presentations about the company. It was more of an orientation (a cult orientation, more like it) than an actual interview.

    After we hooked the poor soul for an interview, we would have to lie and say:

    “Perfect, So as far as openings go for an interview, our manager is extremely busy with running this office, So we have received over 50 applications for the job in the last 2 weeks but since you were referred by someone on our team I can push you ahead of those other 50 applicants…Now are you 100% sure that (time) works for you? GREAT, the reason I ask is because Mr. Cheeks will be spending some extra time in his schedule to meet with you. So it’s important and it also wouldn’t look good for (rep name) if something came up…And I will go ahead and put in a really good work for the manager for you okay!! (Laugh) okay bye!”

    Cheeks IS the name of my “manager”. If you meet him, DO NOT TAKE THE JOB. And the “rep name” of the person to not make a “bad impression” for never actually knew the person anyway.

    What was most annoying was the “celebrations” that they had every time someone nabbed an interview. We were told to make goals, and had to high-five each other after we scammed someone. They would constantly try to pump us up about the “good work” we were doing, but this was only to try and drown out any moral concerns we had.. It felt like being brainwashed.

    Although I do not believe what Vector Marketing (also went by the company name “Franchise”) is illegal, it is seriously immoral. It is a pyramid scheme where pretty much only the most nasty, most harassing, most sleazy people succeed–because they’re really good at scamming people, and apparently enjoy it. If you ever find yourself in a similar situation, refuse the “opportunity” to be a part of the Vector team. Many times, if you don’t act like a cut-throat, scamming criminal, they cite you on some technicality so that they can fire you. And odds are, you will never receive a dime. I had only been with those people for one interview and two days worth of work, but it felt like a month. The worst month of my life.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    This article is about the selling side of Vector. I don’t know much about the receptionist side so I have no comment but thanks for sharing your experience as a receptionist there.

    [Reply]

    Just a rep Reply:

    again it really should be mentioned on these that one experience isn’t the same for the whole company, if you were in a franchise mcdonalds and it was nasty would you then say every mcdonalds in the world is by default nasty. I’m sorry but often when people don’t have something negative to say you will at times argue their points you don’t agree with, but with the ones that are just full of “this place was horrible” it’s a simple thank you for your experience.

    all I’m really saying here is be devil advocate to all comments or none. I do want to recognize that usually your response has been unbiased except to those that are asking for a trolling war. I am merely pointing out that I’ve not seen many if any truly passionate responses to those that only have negative things to say.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    Actually, there are several negative comments that I responded to in favor of Vector. As for personal experience comments, well, it was their experience, usual nothing to argue against unless they state facts that I know aren’t true.

    [Reply]

    Brett - Gravatar
  45. rasheda  |  September 13th, 2011 #

    I dont believe that vector cutlery is a scam it’s just not for everyone. Everybody in the world were not made to sell products some were made to do other things. its a very wonderful program for not just students but anyone who are willing to have the patients to work with other people. First in formost i had an interview just yesterday with the Vector cutlery company its was an amazing and fun exprience. I was so amazed by the way the product actually works. Its better than any knife i’ve ever cut with. You really have to be a people person to do this job and want to sale nice products. Vector is a great opportunity for students as well as people who want to learn how the sales business work { not a scam}

    [Reply]

    rasheda - Gravatar
  46. Kai S.  |  September 13th, 2011 #

    Of course their knives were better than any other knife you’ve cut with because chances are, you’ve never used a knife worth more than $20. Anyway, good luck with Vector. As long as you work hard and learn from the best in the business, you’ll do fine.

    [Reply]

    Brandon Reply:

    And here you are dogging other peoples comments when they say something good about Vector. You are definitely establishing yourself as someone who went in for an interview and didn’t get hired!!

    Working with Vector I have used several of different brands of knives of customers who are actually big competitors to Cutco. Wusthof, Ginsu, Chicago Cutlery, Henkles, and others. Cutco is far more superior than any of these other brands. Rasheda, you are correct with your comment because they really are amazing. I know doing demos for my customers they are always blown away by the quality of Cutco. Many of my customers own other big time brands like the ones I mentioned above and I used those knives for my demonstrations and always show the huge difference in each of the brands. Rasheda, good luck with Vector and I hope you enjoy it! I work there and it is extremely easy and is also a great atmosphere! The product easily sells itself, the only thing you have to do is show your customers the confidence that you have in the product and they will become interested in wanting the product as well! The best thing is, it’s not a cheap product that we’re trying to sell or in any way trying to deceive customers into buying junk. Cutco is a product that everyone loves and can use everyday and the best thing by far about Cutco is that it lasts, literally, forever!

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    It’s cool that you own all of the top brands of knives. Just pointing out that many people who say Cutco is the best knife they’ve ever used never used other expensive knives before.

    As I stated in my article, Cutco knives are great. No arguing there.

    And hey, thanks for liking my blog enough to spend your precious time to come back and comment over and over again.

    [Reply]

    Just a rep Reply:

    lol guy above is kind of an ass, but again my issue is more with the misinformation from the complainers. Only a fraction of which is validated and again it’s really only validated in said region.

    [Reply]

    maria Reply:

    not only is he commenting over and over again, in a vain effort to validate his stanze on the company, he is commenting on commenting over and over and over again.
    and has just made himself look like “the most nasty, most harassing, most sleazy people succeed–because they’re really good at scamming people, and apparently ENJOY IT. ” (emphasis is mine)
    but it is true. you ‘just a rep’ are coming across as harassing, good at scamming and you REALLY seem to enjoy coming back and commenting again and again and …….
    not making a good impression for company if you feel you have to defend that strongly.
    i’ve worked at bad places, and yeah, they also had people who would defend them like you do. i’ve also worked at good places, where the enviroment and the workforce dedication spoke for the company.
    and if a company has a high turn around rate for employees, then it is not a good place. regardless of how great, fantastic or awesome the product.
    and as the kai s has said over and over again (mostly in response to you and brandon), if the job you want is sales AND you are good at it then vector might be a good fit for you. and no, it’s not for everybody.
    not everybody is going to be bill gates, donauld trump or martha stewart or oprah either.
    that was all, just wanted to add my cents worth.
    no, i have not been called by the company. no. i’ve not seen flyers. i was looking for at job sites and was wondering what ‘vector marketing’ was, and now i know.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. - Gravatar
  47. victoria  |  September 18th, 2011 #

    I am currently in the management training program at Vector Marketing. I started working with Vector in June 2011. I find it interesting that people prejudge things they don’t understand. I have not found the company to be a scam at all. I was a little sketched out when I talked to them on the phone, but once my now district manager explained everything to me. All my questions and confusion disappeared. Vector has been an awesome experience for me. I am at over $13,000 in career sales.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    Glad you’re doing well.

    [Reply]

    victoria - Gravatar
  48. Jason  |  September 21st, 2011 #

    The one thing to keep in mind is, the economy is very bad at the present time. I know in my area, job lose is at an all time high. I really can’t give out phone numbers without permission and they would ask for those numbers up front. I tried to explain that situation and they said it was a requirement. I am afraid that when its all said and done, I won’t even make sale minimum because most of my family and friends are struggling to get by and I won’t throw a guilt trip to buy these knives. So to all of you who are wondering what is in it for you, remember these are the people who have your back and unless they have won the lottery, I know my group can’t afford utilities much less extra, unneeded items.

    Always remember what goes around comes around.

    I hope this help.s

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    You’d actually be surprised who would buy these knives. The best clients aren’t always the ones with the most money.

    [Reply]

    Jason - Gravatar
  49. Just a rep  |  September 22nd, 2011 #

    just a quick factoid and this isn’t meant to be “if you disagree you are not patriotic”

    but every dollar you spend on Cutco remains in the US, we manufacture here, our workers work here, all of the wages, and commissions go to Americans, and the money goes to an American company, the only money we get from Hienkles, is the sells tax, and whatever poor fool got paid minimum wage to stock a shelf with them. Cutco helps our economy more then the other knife brands.

    (yes i know Chicago Cutlery is also a US brand, but they shut down their US plant so they could manufacture in China, so the company keeps the money but they aren’t adding back to the economy since they don’t have U.S. employees doing a majority of the work)

    [Reply]

    Just a rep - Gravatar
  50. Janelle  |  September 28th, 2011 #

    You’re talking about how Vector Marketing is misleading. Did you noticed that you titled this “Vector Marketing Scam” and then said, “by the way, it’s not necessarily a scam”? Practice what you preach.
    Another thing, this isn’t commission. It’s base pay, which increases in time, like with any other job… only faster. However, if you make more in commission, you get that pay instead, unless for some reason you choose not to.
    We actually have people at our office making from $600 a week to 2 grand. Yes, 2 grand in one week. However, this person decided to take a vacation after she made this much money. If I were her, this would give me reason to do the same thing the next week. But that’s her choice.

    Also, for the most part, Vector Marketing gets scammed by some of the people they hire. At our office, there have been a couple occurances where the sales rep did not turn in their paperwork and threatened to sue us because we didnt pay them. However, if you do not turn in your paperwork (which tells us how much to pay you) it’s not possible really to pay you.
    Also, some people have tried to turn in forged paperwork to get more pay than they really deserved. And of course, when they dont get their money, they threaten to sue and then go around saying we scammed them. So if anything is a scam, it would be some of the people we mistakenly hire.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    So you’re comparing my short title to how Vector runs its business? Really? In any case, sorry to disappoint you since you were obviously looking for dirt on how Vector is a scam for whatever reason and found my “misleading” article instead.

    Vector is a sales job and money is in the commissions. Base pay is money you get for the time you put in. I guess you can say Vector is base pay with conditions if you want to get technical about it but you’re missing the point. The point is that people are misled to think it’s an hourly paid job.

    As for the income, that’s great to hear but do realize that there plenty of other people with sales jobs that make that much money which is why sales is one of the highest paying professions but at the same time, one of the lowest paying as well which is why I’m guessing Vector just doesn’t outright advertise their job openings as a sales position.

    People suing companies happen all the time but you can’t possibly compare the few incidents to the hundreds or even thousands of students who felt misled by Vector’s advertising. Since you found this article, my guess is that you know there are tons of other sites out there talking badly about Vector. As I’ve stated though, Vector is getting better over the years thanks to these complaints and bad publicity so I give them props for that.

    [Reply]

    Janelle - Gravatar
  51. dominic weldy  |  December 18th, 2011 #

    this is not a scam i work there and it is a really good paying job and i good oppertunity to suceed you all that are saying crap about vector you dont know what you are missing
    one question for you all how in the heck can it be a scam
    if we have been in buisness or what you guys say a scam for 60+ years old y havent any one shut us done????
    i can answer that it cuz we are not a scam and you guys just say that cuz you guys suck at the job

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    You need to read the comments. Many people feel it’s a scam because of their experience and how they felt the job opportunity was misrepresented to them. People have better things to do than to just rip on an innocent company. Vector, at least years ago, was misleading with their job marketing efforts and they’re paying for it. Search the net, there are thousands of students who are against Vector.

    I agree with you that it’s not a scam and they’ve definitely improved a lot thanks to all of the complaints over the years. Once they iron out all of the things that cause people to call them a scam, the label will eventually go away.

    As a side note, if you’re going to make an argument on a thread of comments mainly consisting of people who are against you, it’s probably a good idea to check your spelling and grammar. It just gives a tad more credibility and will prevent anyone from ripping on you for it, that is unless you did that on purpose to show that even someone who can’t write coherently can succeed at this job. If so, bravo.

    [Reply]

    dominic weldy - Gravatar
  52. Ben Dover  |  February 21st, 2012 #

    I am currently a Branch Manager with Vector Marketing and have hit all the sales promotions available with the company. This job is not a scam it is simply not right for some people. Sales are something you either love or hate. Your good at it or your not, plain and simple. We teach our representatives to be successful. If they follow the program they will be. Its a good way to gain some great resume experience and earn some extra income part time for students. The income is great as long as you are not lazy and want to actually put forth an effort. I should average about $800 a week with my dual income (personal sales and office sales) this month.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    You’re right. Sales really is something you either love or hate. Getting into sales can be life changing for some folks. For others, it can be an experience they will never want to go through again.

    Congrats on your success, “Ben Dover” with Vector Marketing.

    [Reply]

    Ben Dover - Gravatar
  53. Kait  |  February 28th, 2012 #

    I work for Vector. It’s great. I am a theatre major so I have no time for a scheduled job, but this fits around my ever changing rehearsal schedule and I make bank. Stop whining because you didn’t get the job. Not everyone wants to hire people who only want to make base pay. I make a ton more than that and my boss loves it. He doesn’t hire ppl who ask about it because it means your a bait pay chaser and the company expects better employees.

    [Reply]

    Kait - Gravatar
  54. Wally  |  March 4th, 2012 #

    I worked for Vector for 8 days. It was the worst and sketchiest job I have ever had. I was a college graduate that was hit really hard by the falling of the economy. I took the job because I had no choice. There were things from the start that seemed off and wrong. I knew that any company that was worth anything, ALWAYS PAYS FOR YOUR TRAINING. They waste a total of 24 hours of your life on training that you never get paid for. You have to drive to the place where you are being trained every day only to never see any money for that training period. You are already in the hole for driving their because of gas.

    The ad that I had received was $17 an hour but never stated what you were doing. I filled out the application and not even a half hour later I had gotten a phone call. All the person on the phone new was my name and could not tell me anything about what I had on my resume. Most places can. They just had my name and number and that is all they cared about.

    I went in for the interview and found out that there are no benefits, 401k, health care, nothing. On the plus side I did not have to buy my demo kit. When I was in the interview my resume was never even asked for or looked at when I offered it. This should have been my second clue.

    When I had started training I had noticed how the company attempts to use subliminal messaging in how they repeat words, over and over and over and over and over again to get you to agree. At this point I knew it was too good to be true but I wanted to see how bad it truly was going to be. I ended up finding out that you are cold calling all of your friends and family over 25 years old only to sell them knives. Also you only got the $17 an hour by completing an appointment only. On the last day of training they ask you to submit your weekly schedule.

    Since I could create my own hours at this job and decided I was going to do it part time meaning 2 or 3 appointments a week while I continued looking for another job I had submitted that and they said it was ok. I got a phone call every day I worked for them at 7 a.m. asking me to come in and do a “phone jam” which is cold calling and is actually illegal and it is a loophole in the law which is how they get around it because they have you call your friends and family. I got phone calls asking me to come to the office at 9:30 at night to call people. They wanted you to work from 7 a.m. till you went to bed.

    I had sold $978 worth of merchandise to friends and family who already owned Cutco and only bought from me because they knew I needed the money. To get them to buy anything I had to sell them things for free as well which made me even less money. My largest sale was for $310.00 and they returned it when they looked into the business practices of Cutco and how they treat their sales and marketing team. They sent me a bill asking for money back. They billed me for $31.00 and I only made $17.00 on the sale. I never paid it back to them and I never will. I only made $120 out of 10 appointments. And I sold something at every single appointment. I never got fully paid and I went negative on my expenses in 4 days after training. The best part is when I went in to return my kit they were firing people for not selling enough. I stated I was returning it and that I had found another job, which I had not I was just tired of the lies, and they told me I was fired for not selling enough product in my time with them after I had signed the returned kit receipt.

    I ended up finding out how bad this company really is and because of this I will never buy any Cutco products. The sad thing is my parents own Cutco and love it. They bought it all out of a catalog over 18 years ago. I knew about the product before I even started to sell it. They lost a customer for life and I tell everyone I can about my experience when working for them. What I gained from the company was the ability to sell someone anything, no joke, I convinced someone in the bar that they wanted to buy me a beer because they owed it to me because I am a good person. I did not even know this person and they were sober as was I. The other thing I gained from them was debt. I went negative on all of my monthly expenses because of them for that month. Yes they are a scam and a horrible company. No one can ever tell me otherwise.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    Thanks for sharing your experience although I have to say that some things were unclear. You said you got some debt because of the job. Was this just from that one returned order and the gas you had to pay? As for training, it’s not uncommon for sales jobs that pay 100% commission to not pay for training. However, I see that you, like many others, thought that the job paid by the hour and probably expected to be paid for training. Didn’t they tell you it’s not paid before you went into training though?

    They should really change their ads to say $xx per qualified appointments or at least include a link to their FAQ page on their website which basically lays out what the job is about.

    http://vectormarketing.com/got-questions/

    I noticed that they don’t mention “qualified appointments” under the “what’s in it for me” section. If I didn’t know any better, I would assume that any appointments with anyone qualifies for the base pay. They should clearly state what actually qualifies.

    [Reply]

    Wally - Gravatar
  55. Cecilia  |  March 4th, 2012 #

    I’m a receptionist at one of the Vector offices. My job is to “sell a job” if you will. My soul purpose at the company is to get people to come in for interviews. Like anyone who is trying to sell something over the phone, I have to follow a script for the most part. If you had someone tell you that it is a $15.00/hour pay, then the receptionist you spoke to was not properly doing their job. We are supposed to say “There is a $15.00 base pay that is NOT based on sales and IS guaranteed” The exact wording varies based on what kind of call it is, but we are NEVER allowed to say that it is hourly. We always have to say “base pay.” If the potential representative asks if it is hourly, we have to tell them that they will have to talk to the manager. Personally, I would not be a rep, but I’m not very good at sales. I don’t necessarily agree with the our district office is run, but it’s not my place to make business decisions, only to get people to come in for an interview. Some people do really well with the company, others not so much. In the office I work at, we rarely hire people over the age of 30 (which I think is weird, because with their experience, the company could make even more.) I saw a comment that said they were supposed to meet with one manager, and ended up with an assistant manager. Well, we are told that certain interviews will be run by certain managers. From time to time, the manager running an interview will change, and we are not notified, so we say the name of the manager that we were originally told will be running it. I don’t believe that it is a scam, I believe that it is difficult, and some people wont be able to succeed at it. And the names we take during the interviews, are not for your client list, they are for us to call as people that might be interested in getting hired. The people you call to make appointments with is a different list entirely. I’m sure there are other things that I am forgetting, but this is all I have to say about it…for now.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    Thanks for your comment Cecilia. It’s interesting that you’re told to tell potential reps that they need to talk to a manager if they ask if the job pays by the hour even though you know the answer.

    When you tell potential reps that it’s base pay, do you also elaborate and tell them that it only counts if they do presentations to qualified people?

    I’m guessing the reason why most of the people working there are college students is because many people will buy from students just to support them, starting with their parents. And when you tell them that you’re trying to make money to pay for college expenses, it’s hard for people you personally know to not buy at least a peeler.

    It’s a different story with an older person. Imagine being 40 and having to call up your friends with established careers to sell them knives. You could hit the cold market, but let’s be real here, who would let a total stranger with knives into their home? This is why little girls can sell cookies door to door way better than adults can.

    [Reply]

    Cecilia Reply:

    When we tell potential reps about the base pay, we only say what the base pay is for our district and that it is guaranteed. If they ask any questions about it we have to tell them to speak with the manager. I do know more about the job than I am supposed to say over the phone. The reason the managers tell us to only say certain things is because they do spend about 90 minutes on the interview, and it is hard for us to explain it all over the phone. They say that it will take far too long to explain it all to them and if they are really interested in finding out more, they will come in. We have a lot of people who don’t show up to interviews and cancel interviews. If they don’t show up for the interview, we have to call them, so if you anybody reads this and decides not to come to the interview you scheduled, please call the receptionist and let them know, because otherwise we have to call you.

    What you say about the college students does make a lot of sense actually. So thank you for that example.

    [Reply]

    Cecilia - Gravatar
  56. josh  |  March 9th, 2012 #

    i just wanted to share my recent experience and from reading the above comments it looks like it varys quite a bit and from state to state and the product you are selling can be different like ive just been hired on last week and being former military i was weary at first. but heres what i know its not an hourly job and this is the first ive heard that it was i was told straight from the start of the first interview there was a weekly base pay or commision which ever was greater so being a commission job its a real luxury to have the saftey net to fall back on yes its alot of hours but if your a salesman at heart its a great oppurtunity here in texas though im not selling knives or going to peoples houses instead i work in stores such as eletronic stores or general retail stores selling satelite subscriptions for a company. each store has a differnt incentive package such as gift cards or discounts so i guess its just like joining the military since you have your good recruiters and those who twist the truth just be careful and always know what your getting into i learned myself from the government contract lol hope this helps

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    I believe everyone knows it’s per appointment pay once they go into the interview. The problem is that not everyone knows that upon first learning about the job whether it’s through a flyer, a job posting at school or online, or a letter. People are simply used to seeing a dollar per hour rate so when they see $15 or $17, some automatically assume it’s an hourly pay. For a college student, those are some attractive wages.

    [Reply]

    josh - Gravatar
  57. Hector  |  March 23rd, 2012 #

    I went to an interview. They have two different ways of paying, the “base” and the “incentive”, you either get the base or the incentive, which ever one is higher. The base is $17 per presentation of the product and each presentation lasts up to 45 to 60 minutes. With the incentive you start wit 10% of what you sell if you’re good you move up to 20% of what you sell, then to 30% and once you’re at 30% there’s other benefits that come with it.

    A lot of you go by what you see or hear on the media. I think its a great opportunity for someone trying to get some experience, this job goes good on your resume.

    One thing i like about this job is that you don’t have to lie in order to sell. You let the people use a sample of the product during the presentation.

    3 months ago i applied for the San Diego Union Tribune and i did not like it at all. You have to knock on doors and lie and make up your own lies, they don’t tell you what to say. And its very unprofessional unlike Vector

    [Reply]

    Hector Reply:

    Plus the knives are amazing, the fishers knife is my favorite. I would buy them for the hell of it. Thats another thing i liked, its a good product, its something people would buy.

    [Reply]

    Hector - Gravatar
  58. Jodie  |  April 20th, 2012 #

    Here’s my opinion:

    I spent the past three years job searching, dirt broke, constantly asking for money from my parents just to help pay for gas and such. I never even considered a sales job before, being mostly experienced in childcare and theatrical arts, but when I saw the 15.75/base appointment entry level position on craigslist, I figured I’d at least take a look. I ended up getting accepted. Now as for the amount, on every advertisement I’ve ever handed out for advertising on campus (one hour away from a free leather role up, after that it’s $10 cutco bucks per hour which can be saved to win more knives), has it EVER SAID PER HOUR. The posters are extremely clear, they say base/appointment. But most of us don’t make that comfort zone. We make commission. I am currently earning 30% of my sales, and yes, if the situation comes up and I make no sales or little sales in a week, I will get the 15.70 per appointment for that week, but that has happened to me a total of three times in the four months I’ve been on the job, and we get paid weekly.

    Sure, the training is boring, but I definitely learned a lot from it, and never even thought about the fact it was unpaid. It was merely three days! On the second day, we signed a contract, saying that we were to receive a free sample kit, which can be returned at any time for free, or we can choose to buy it at $88, while the kit is valued over $300. So I received the kit for free. To anyone who says they had to pay for a kit, that is in the past. Besides, at any time, they were allowed to send it back and get their deposit back on the kit. But now, it doesn’t cost a cent for the starter kit.

    Then we were to come up with a list of 10 married couples, and here’s where the real work began. Because this job is not door to door, nor a telemarketing job, we are not allowed to do cold calling. So of course, I called my parents and they helped me come up with a list of 34, the more you have, the better of a start you will get. And you know what? On the third day of training, we were allowed to start right afterwards, and I made a $300 sale on my second appointment! And yes, I have never seen a paycheck go missing, as some like to claim on other sites.

    Four months later, I am on my fourth promotion, earning 30% of sales, have sold over 10k, been to two conferences, have won several knives, and have several opportunities to win exotic trips through sales. My goal is to make it to Punta Cana, Dominican Repulic, next January.

    So is this a scam? Hell no! Is it hard work, and if you don’t put in the effort, of course you’re not going to fail. It’s simple, the more calls you make (use the house phone, it’s one price per month unlimited calling), the more appointments you make, the more appointments you make, the more you will get paid and have your paychecks go up

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    Thanks for sharing your experience. You’re right, if you put in the effort, just like with most sales jobs, you can make good money.

    I do have to point out that although the ads don’t say per hour, people are simply accustomed to seeing a dollar amount and assuming it’s per hour since all other job postings is per hour when a dollar amount is shown. If most people make more than the per base appointment anyway, why even use that number? Simple, it gets people to call in for the interview. If Vector really wants to make it clear, they should put (base/appointment NOT per hour) in bold but they don’t. Maybe you can get them to change that but I doubt it will ever happen.

    Sales is a high turn over industry and the more people they get to call in for an interview, the more sales people they can potentially get. It’s as simple as that.

    With the pay talk aside though, I agree that you can really learn a lot from this type of job. Unlike a normal job where you get paid just to show up, sales jobs teaches you that you need to work to earn those paychecks and the harder you work, the more you get paid. It’s a good mentality to have if you ever decide to run your own business.

    Good luck on your goal. I hope you hit it.

    [Reply]

    Jodie - Gravatar
  59. Jonny  |  May 9th, 2012 #

    I just had a recent experience with Vector, it was interesting to say the least. But be sure to do your research, something I didn’t do.

    Currently I am a studentat a SoCal college. I saw someone advertising Vector by the library, so I figured why not check them out since I need the work experience and internships are hard to get nowadays. So after filling out the info, I figured I would wait and see. It turns out I did not have to wait long. About an hour later, in the middle of class, I got a phone call asking for the first interview to be a few hours later. This should have been the first warning sign. I tried to get it pushed back to a later day, but to no avail. So, still thinking this was a worthwhile endeavor, I figured why not go along with it. So I dropped everything, ran home and got my best business clothes and went to the interview. According to the e-mail, I was supposed to interview with the guy who was head of the office. Instead I ended up being interviewed by the very same recruiter. And looking back on it, that interview was not so much an interview but a praise fest to lower my defenses. After about 5-10 minutes, I was told that I was able to make the second interview, the group interview. Naturally, being excited, I called my family to tell them that I was going to be late because of the second interview. However, they became suspicious instead and decided to research the company.

    Now this where I made a mistake. From how the recruiter marketed it and all the little cards and flyers marketed it, I thought this was a service that would help place me in a job with a corporation. Sort of like a headhunter. It turns out after my family did some quick research, I found out that the purpose of Vector is to sell Cutco Knives. It is a business sort of like Mary Kay Cosmetics or Tupperware. Now this is fine for experienced sales people, but considering that I have enough college debt racked up, I was hoping for something with more security, and not a job where I would have to also buy the product just to sell it. After hearing this, I decided to skip the second interview and go home. Now I am not saying this is a scam. And I am not even saying that I made the right decision in walking out. What I am saying though is that they went about this the wrong way, and although this is just my opinion, I’m not sure if this is the right job for college students who are just entering the business world. If you really feel confident in your ability to sell, then by all means join. But if you were expecting a regular office job like I was, then don’t bother.

    As for whether or not I made the right decision, that all depends on whether or not I get a new job.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    Thanks for sharing your experience, Jonny. From what I know, they no longer require you to purchase the demo kit. You can now borrow it. You’re right about expectations though. Someone going in for an interview thinking it’s one thing and finding out it’s something else might not be very happy which is why lots of students have called this company a scam. It’s really just a sales job. It would be nice if they would just make that clear when trying to recruit college students.

    [Reply]

    Jonny - Gravatar
  60. Bob  |  May 14th, 2012 #

    Ok, so I got the same thing you all got in the mail, a recruiting letter from Vector. Now since they did not really say what kind of company they were exactly, I went to look it up. To my surprise the first thing that came up with the Bing search engine was Vector marketing scam. Naturally, I was discouraged about joining the company. I have not called them yet but I am thinking about it. I’m not confident but I’m hopeful and optimistic. Again I’m a college student like everyone here. I have been trying to research about weither or not Vector is an evil scamming company or a proud step into a better future for me thing. A good number of you people are defending Vector, so I cannot nessesarily say that Vector hired people to protect their image. On the other hand there is also a good number of people condemning Vector as a scam, which I think could be valid as well. I can see that their are two sides to this shindig (yes I just said that). Now who can tell me the cons and the pros to this Vector job offering as simple as possible. I just want a simple honest given facts because I cannot find a source that is not biased for either side. I’m also aware that it might not be possible to find that though. Anyone want to help clear up the facts for me?

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    Bob, Vector may be a bit misleading in the way they advertise their job openings but it’s not a scam. The biggest advantage with working for them is that you have a chance to make several thousand dollars a month. Since it’s a sales job, the more you sell, the more you make. Another benefit is picking up skills that you can use in the future. Sales is tough but you can learn a lot from it.

    As for cons, it depends on what you’re looking for in a job. If you’re looking for a, “I show up and you pay me” type of job, you’ll be disappointed. You’ll have to set appointments, drive to people’s homes, and conduct demonstrations of the products. The amount of money you make will really depend on how many appointments you can set up. In other words, it’s not exactly a walk in the park type of job.

    My advice is if after reading the comments above and you find yourself still interested, just go for it. You never know, it could turn out to be a great experience for you. You know what the job entails and how the hiring and training process goes so there shouldn’t be any surprises at this point.

    [Reply]

    Bob - Gravatar
  61. Carol Ciancutti  |  May 22nd, 2012 #

    Thank you for a good explanation of the scam. My son is 18 and going to graduate high school next month. As I am out of work, I desperately need to find some income soon. However, I would not prostitute my child just for an income nor myself. I have done customer service work and I have also been a victim of a scam, so I am very wary of these types of opportunities. My son will still fill out applications for other places even if it means he gets paid less than $18 an hour.
    Thank you.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    Just to be clear, Vector isn’t a scam. Many students do make good money but as with any sales job, the amount one makes depends on their effort. Some people take the job and it ends up being a great experience while others take the job and it ends up just wasting their time. I’d just forget the $18 an hour idea and just see it as 100% commission.

    [Reply]

    Carol Ciancutti - Gravatar
  62. Scam Artist  |  May 22nd, 2012 #

    Just to be clear, Vector is a scam.

    As a Scam Artist myself, I salute all of you who are playing a part getting kids to believe they are going to make money; when it’s the folks higher in the scam I mean pyramid scheme who do well.

    Bravo, keep up the great work deluding kids and wasting people’s time and money.

    yours sincerely,

    Scam Artist

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    Vector is a marketing company that makes money by hiring people to sell their products. Same with insurance companies, real estate firms, and companies who do door to door. The pyramid scheme you’re referring to are related to the MLM world where most people make money by recruiting others instead of selling the actual products. Let’s not confuse the two.

    [Reply]

    Scam Artist - Gravatar
  63. Alyssa  |  May 23rd, 2012 #

    I have been reading articles from numerous sites for hours, and I have seen both bad and good reviews about Vector. The bad reviews all claim that Vector is a scam and leaves people in the dark until they experience it themselves, while all of the good reviews claim that it is upfront and only a good job for hard workers.

    Two days ago I was called by a Vector employee saying that my friend had put me down as a good candidate for their recruitment, and was asked to come in for an interview that day at 6. I was half excited to have an opportunity to make more money this summer before I go back to school, and half unsure about what I was getting myself into, given the fact that I didn’t even know what kind of company Vector was or what the job was about. I was the first one to show up to the interview, and was asked to take a seat and fill out some information about myself, a lot like an application. I was called back into a room for the first interview and to be honest it was a complete joke. The only two questions she asked were “are you looking for experience” and ” do you have a positive attitude” before asking me to stay for a second 90 minute group interview. I went and sat with the other four young people who had filed in behind me and noticed that I was the only one dressed for an interview even though it was clearly said to dress up. We were given a presentation that answered just about everything I had been wondering about Vector. There were a few questions in between, but none directly asked to any of us. Let me just say, I didn’t say a word besides volunteering my penny to be cut in half.

    The presentation was great, but I found myself wondering when the interview part was going to start. Before I knew it, it was over. We were asked to fill out another paper asking about our goals with the company and for ourselves within the next year. During this time, the interviewer would call us back one by one to let us know if we had gotten the job. When it was my turn, she read a few points on my paper and said I was hired.

    Usually I would be excited to have impressed them and to have the opportunity to make some more money, but I was still feeling unsure about the whole thing when I left hence why I searched “Vector Marketing Company Scam” the day of my first training session. I understand both sides of the argument, and I truly believe that people who have good work ethic, a positive attitude, and perseverance can succeed at this job. On the other hand I have decided not to follow through with training today because A. There is a debate in the first place, B. The company had to be sued in order to make any improvement to become ethical to its employees, and C. They were desperate enough when recruiting to contact me, hire me to go into homes selling knives without knowing a thing about me, and to leave out the most important information about the company until the second interview.

    Some may disagree with my opinion, but any company that leaves young college students like myself feeling vulnerable and unsure, is not a company I would be proud to work for.

    [Reply]

    Alyssa - Gravatar
  64. Kai S.  |  May 23rd, 2012 #

    The reason why they seem “desperate” in recruiting people seeing that they recruit just about anyone is because they have a very high turn over rate. This isn’t just Vector though. Most sales jobs will have a high turn over rate since most people don’t do well in sales.

    As for trusting a random person to go sell knives in people’s homes, well, you’ll actually be doing demos in homes of people you know, at least in the beginning, such as your parents, relatives, friends’ parents, etc. From there, you’ll be asking them for referrals. You might not know these people personally, but there’s at least some level of connection. In other words, you’re not going door to door and doing demos to complete strangers.

    As I mentioned several times on this page, there probably wouldn’t be much of a debate if Vector would just advertise their job as a sales job and just drop the whole $ per base commission gimmick. It’s confusing and causing them to have a bad reputation. They only do it because they know it will attract students to their interviews. It’s all a numbers game for them.

    Thanks for sharing your experience. At least you know their shears are good enough to cut through a penny :)

    [Reply]

    Kai S. - Gravatar
  65. james  |  May 25th, 2012 #

    I understand how this works.I sold rainbow vacs for about 5 years.Same type of program basically.When I was first hired i was told I would get 10.00 per demo,or 100.00 per sale. Didn’t really like the idea of going to strangers homes and trying to show a 1200.00 vac.,mind you this was in 87,but tried it anyway.
    Same story,write down names of friends and family,start there and get referrals.i was in Amarillo at the time and only knew a couple of people.tried it then gave up.Two months later another distributer visited with me and hired me to sell rainbows for 300.00 per sale and moved me to guymon ok.he trained me his way,just be the good ol country sales guy.well I liked it and did real well.He started me with a list of 5 of his referrals and I was off!!!
    This was the best thing I ever did.I did this until he passed away.I now sell cars for a living and owe it all to getting into sales with rainbow.
    Anyway,the key to something like Vectors program is to get referrals in the home.If you can ,have the one you just demoed call their referrals while you’re there and set up your next appt for you!!!
    That’s how I was successfull selling Rainbows. My 18 yearold son has an interview with vector tonight..I’m going to tell him just what i’m saying here “BELIEVE IN YOUR PRODUCT AND GET REFERRALS”

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    Sales can be an awesome career if you can enjoy it and are good at it. I’m glad things worked out for you. As for your suggestion on getting your customers to call their referrals for you, yes, that’s the best way to go about landing appointments. It’d also be a good idea to ask them to not mention the price since the whole point of the demo is to build up value first. And yes, it’s ALL about getting referrals to stay alive in this business. Anyway, great tips James. I hope your son has a great experience.

    [Reply]

    james - Gravatar
  66. Megan  |  May 27th, 2012 #

    I was a “receptionist” for Vector for about a month. My experience in working for the company wasn’t very great. I felt very uncomfortable not being allowed in telling possible employees they’d be working in sales, which is what they’d be doing. I was supposed to tell them they’d be in “customer sales and service”. My manager was always telling me to same day schedule people even going as far as to try and have students skip a class for an interview! I’m an honest straight forward person and hated being told to tell half truths or be extremely vague with people. But most of all, I HATED the fact that my manager could not seem to pay me on time! I was given the run around about my paycheck several different times. Something happened with the branches bank account, something happened with the checks, something always happened. As it stands now, I’m actually still owed money and I’m supposed to get paid via mail. I highly doubt I actually get paid, something may happen like the US Postal service gets shut down, something out of her control. I honestly don’t care though. I’m glad to be rid of them, and count it as a lesson learned. I do have one good thing to say though! Cutco is an amazing product! I doubt i would invest any more of my money into the company after working for them, but the knives I own are the best knives I’ve ever owned. Five years later and they’re still as sharp as the day I purchased them!

    [Reply]

    Megan - Gravatar
  67. Unknown  |  June 4th, 2012 #

    I worked with Vector for like a month, and what a waste that was. I do remember having to pay $100.00 for some sort of…fee; that should of been my first warning that this job was no good. I didn’t have a job obviously, so I had to ask a family member for $100.00. I went to the boring classes, and I do remember that this was a sales type job obviously, and that I had to buy a few things so that I can start selling the knives. So, I was able to sell off a huge set of knives (and the knives ARE good btw) for $1,500. All I got in return for selling the knives was $45.00…which is less than the fee I had to give when I started that stupid job!

    I remember feeling so miserable saying to myself, “there has to be something better than this”, and there was. Look, it’s hard to say that if this is a scam job, but I do feel as if I was short-changed. I eventually stop going to the meetings because the guy was sort of a jerk, and selling huge knives for such little gain isn’t worth it. Plus, I would never again work for any place whereas I have to pay to get hired. Just keep looking for your job. I dunno ’bout yall, but I trust in Jesus, and through Him I was able to get a run-of-the-mill job, even though I’m about to join the Army now, so…be blessed and trust in the Lord!

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    This must’ve been a while ago because I believe Vector took out the demo kit purchase requirement, or at least most offices did. Even if some require you to buy the demo kit, you can always return it or even sell it for a profit.

    [Reply]

    Unknown - Gravatar
  68. Randall  |  June 5th, 2012 #

    Okay, my older brother just got offered a job to Vector through the mail and I somehow think it’s a scam. I’m not totally sure if it is, but I need some reassurance so he can be at ease. I’ve seen videos about former Vector employees saying it’s an adult version of an elementary school fundraiser and you basically work a lot for only little to no pay. I even got offered a job by Vector two years earlier and I was only a high school freshmen. So I turned my part down, but my brother seems very hopeful about getting this job. What is the best choice that anyone reccommends about going to work for Vector Marketing?

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    I say to tell him to just give it a try. The worse that can happen is that he’ll waste a week or two. On the flip side, he might make a few hundred or even over a thousand dollars. As for the pay, I think it’s pretty decent if you can actually sell the knives. You start out with 10% and as you accumulate more sales, it moves up and can go up to 50% plus bonuses. If he ever gets up that high, which most people don’t, seeing how much the knives cost, that can be some good part time income right there. Sell a set for $800 in a 1 hour demo, $400.

    Of course, this is just what’s possible. Even at 10% commission, as long as he can make a sale, he’ll average more than minimum wage for sure, more than double that amount actually. As I’ve pointed out though, this is sales, and most people suck at sales. Dealing with rejection can hurt and make people want to quit too soon so if he’s looking for a “show up and get paid” job, then tell him to find another job. If he’s up for the challenge and experience just to see what happens, then go for it.

    [Reply]

    Randall - Gravatar
  69. Fola  |  June 9th, 2012 #

    Ok, a friend I just presented to called and told me that Vector was a huge scam, so I googled the company and found this blog. I started working for Vector this Monday, and it has really been stressing me out to tell you the truth. I am a recent hs graduate, and I need the money desperately. When the manager hired me, I was ecstatic because she made me feel very special. But after going to 2 training sessions (hours upon hours long) I feel I am not cut out for the job at all. I hate to quit, because the manager has placed a huge amount of pressure on all the reps to succeed, and I despise backing out of challenges. But the job is impractical for someone in my place.

    Vector may not be a real scam, but it certainly isn’t a good job. First, there is no way you can be successful if you don’t have at least 100 friends you are on a speaking basis with and live close by. I am a quiet and reserved person with few close friends – apparently i did well enough during the interview that the manager didn’t see this – and this has been an enormous drawback. VECTOR DID NOT INFORM ME ABOUT THE NATURE OF THE JOB AT ALL. During training you are forced to make calls to these “friends” and ask them to set up appts. with you. Even if they are friends/family, this is humiliating and awkward. THE CALLS ARE EXPLOITATIVE AND UNFAIR AND WILL PROBABLY RUIN A FEW OF MY RELATIONSHIPS. THANKS, VECTOR! :D Also, if you fail to make enough appointments or even write down 100+ potential customers, THE MANAGER SEES YOU AS LAZY AND UNDERPERFORMING. ALL OF THE REWARDS IN THIS JOB COME FROM BEING POPULAR, AND HAVING A LOT OF PHONE CONTACTS. If you don’t measure up to vector standards of popularity, DONT WASTE YOUR TIME.

    Second, the products are overpriced. I guess being from a immigrant family, most of my relatives/ family friends are from the same background and can’t come near affording any of the products. AND THEN YOU UNCONSCIOUSLY MAKE THEM FEEL GUILTY AND/OR WASTE THEIR TIME. The most popular set is the Homemaker which costs over $1000. It’s not a good investment unless you are a professional chef. I don’t know personally anyone who can afford the products – again, blame me for lack of connections.

    Important – if you don’t have a license or even your own car, just forget it. FYI You will waste gallons and gallons of gas just driving to appointments and trainings all throughout the week. (btw- this may be irrelevant, but the building looks like a rundown brothel) When I set up my interview, the receptionist LIED and said there was a Vector location in my city, but turns out, I have to get someone to drive me thirty minutes to and fro every meeting and then another thirty minutes to and fro just to pick me up. Call me dumb, but no one told me that you needed a license or a car to do this job.

    Ok, I sound really mad. And I am. I hate it that I was tricked into doing this job and I will have to SPEND ANOTHER HOUR IN COMMUTE TO DRIVE BACK TO VECTORS OFFICE JUST TO RETURN THESE STUPID KNIVES THAT NO ONE WANTED TO BUY (DUH – who wants a pair of shears for $99??!!). And because the company lied about the nature of the job, i have to go with my tail between my legs to the manager and tell her i can’t do it. AND I HATE THAT. OH YEAH, AND FIRST I’LL PICK UP MY CHECK FOR $34 THAT I WORKED SO HARD TO EARN. :)

    At least i learned one thing: I’ll never fall for this sort of crap again.
    Vector spies or whatever will probably trace this post and I’ll get in trouble, but I don’t care. that’s where I’m at right now.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    Thanks for sharing your experience, Fola.

    Although it helps tremendously to know a lot of people, theoretically, you only need to know a couple of people how happen to know a lot of people since after every presentation, you’re supposed to ask for referrals and that’s basically how you stay in business. Even if you don’t sell anything, as long as you can get a handful of referrals and can set up appointments with a few of them, you’ll still have people to do demos to and another crack at a potential sale.

    And yeah, it helps to have your own car in order to drive to people’s homes to do the presentations unless you can get demos with people who live around your neighborhood.

    For people who don’t mind the world of sales and are willing to put in the effort, it could be a good experience but it’s definitely not for most people. But hey, at least you made $34 which means you at least sold something or did 2 demos. :)

    [Reply]

    Fola - Gravatar
  70. Ken b  |  June 19th, 2012 #

    Thank you for the advice im in the same setting u r in execpt for the car part

    [Reply]

    Ken b - Gravatar
  71. David  |  July 14th, 2012 #

    hey u know i work for vector, well i just started and im excited to be doing this but ive been getting all kinds of crap from people telling me its a scam its kinda making me mad now. i just lost a friend right now arguing about this company and she only had outdated info to try and tell me it was a scam. like u have to pay for the kit and u have to pay for the training and u only get money if u sell. i wouldnt have taken the job if i didnt know the whole story, and it was explained really clear in the interviews and training sessions. There is nothing wrong with this Company in my mind but ive been told im stupid and retarded for falling for this vector crap and im domber then i look if i go along with this. well I don’t care anymore im happy and im gonna show all of them my BIG FAT CHECK when it comes!!! ohh yeah!!! hahahahaha

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    As I said, it’s not a scam, more like misleading job ads but since you know what it’s all about, then it’s just a legit sales job. You can definitely make good money if you can consistently do a bunch of demos each week. If you can get say, 15-20 demos a week consistently, that should be more than enough to “show” your friends. Good luck!

    [Reply]

    nolie Reply:

    I just want to know vector offerd me a job if i dont sell nothing at all i mean even being there for years do i still get paid or fired even if i do set up alot of appointments

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    You get paid for making qualified appointments. The products are good enough that you’ll actually make some sales here and there anyway. So if you can get the appointments, don’t worry about getting paid. Getting the appointments is the hardest part.

    [Reply]

    David - Gravatar
  72. Dominique  |  February 21st, 2013 #

    I have worked for vector marketing in the past. It is not a scam. The pay is based per presentation (about $15/hr) and sales comission. Each presentation takes about an hour. There is a fee for the sales kit, which is a good deal considering the retail value of the products. I worked for vector for a couple months and made great money, accumulating over 1500 in sales, and considering I worked less than 15hrs/week it was more than substancial pay. The only reason I am not still with the company is I had issues with my vehicle and could not drive to my appointments. Whoever thinks this is a scam obviously doesnt understand sales or this page would not exsist. I ran my own business for over seven years and this company taught me many skills to promote myself and is a great enrty level job for anyone looking to get into sales.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    I understand sales and yet this page exists. I agree with you of course which anyone taking the time to read the actual article would know my stance on Vector. The main problem people have is the misleading marketing that some offices use. If people can get past that and are interested in getting into the field of sales, then Vector can provide a great experience.

    [Reply]

    Dominique - Gravatar
  73. dylan  |  June 13th, 2013 #

    I just recently began training at cutco and am feeling cautious right now. not because of what people said but because I have always been very cynical about people overall. I went there because they said you would be answering questions customers have about a products and low and behold I end up selling knives? they told me it would be “16 DOLLARS AN HOUR” and that quickly turned into apointments when I got there.

    Also the person I was being interviewed by had a huge stack of papers that had a huge “UNAPROVED” on the back of them as they were flipped over, they were also at the corner near the door turned so that anyone coming for the interview would see them. the funniest part was when the interviewer had to answer a call I flipped the pages and there was no names or info on them….

    the people I was in training with were unenergetic, unmotivated and definitely not cut to sell something as hard a sell as cutco knives. so that leads me to belive that all of the applicants were accepted and the papers were there to make it seem like it was a job that was hard to get into. not to mention that the representative was younger then me…im 20.

    not to mention that my representative wanted me to make a hundred appointments in a week…I would literally work over a hundred hours for 16.50 I may not get and incentive that may not occur.

    IF YOU GET MAIL FROM VECTOR OR CUTCO, DO NOT REPLY AND IF THEY CALL YOU TELL THEM IM NOT INTERESTED. THIS WAS A HUGE WASTE OF MY TIME, and yes the capitals were required. Its called emphasis, something vector learned to to use to trick the more innocent college student into practically free labor.

    [Reply]

    Kai S. Reply:

    Sketchy hiring practices by some offices is one of the reasons people call Vector a scam but if you can get past this and just focus on the selling aspect, it’s not as bad as it looks. Why do they hire just about anyone who doesn’t look like a bum? Probably because they figure if they can get everyone to sell at least something to a family member or friends, it’ll be worth it.

    I do think they should make sure every office is completely honest about what the job is and how it’s paid instead of “answering questions” and “$16/hr”.

    [Reply]

    dylan - Gravatar

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